ISI and labor movements for Brazil and Chile

ISI and labor movements for Brazil and Chile - ISI and...

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ISI and labor movements for Brazil and Chile Brazil and Chile: ISI The domestic demand for manufactured goods were very limited and this made industries run up against a lack of buyers. The people of Brazil could only purchase so many refrigerators. The problem of limited markers might have been solved through the creation of regional trade associations. Unlike in Chile, Brazil’s ISI process had to do with currency devaluation in order to increase exports and discourage imports. This was to promote locally manufactured goods. The government’s policies towards investments in Brazil were not always against foreign capital. The industrialization process for Brazil was basically based on a tripod that included foreign, private, and governmental capital. Brazil’s strategy left a legacy of problems and also distortions. The growth resulted in an increase in imports, and foreign exchange policies of the period meant an inadequate export growth. For Chile, the core political and economical
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This note was uploaded on 03/10/2010 for the course IR 365 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at USC.

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ISI and labor movements for Brazil and Chile - ISI and...

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