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Presentation Outline - I II Define unicameralism Define...

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I. Define unicameralism II. Define bicameralism/upper chamber a. How members of the upper house are (usually) implemented (how they are elected, examples, etc.) i. indirect election (most common) ii. appointment by gov’t iii. heredity iv. many states use a mix of several systems (examples) b. Advantages/disadvantages i. Advantage – less sudden change in policy ii. Advantage—checks and balances (USA) iii. Advantage – make decisions more clearly; not in public spotlight iv. Disadvantage – less democratic, usually. (heredity, appointment, election by parliaments/councilors) v. Disadvantage -- Most upper houses are ineffective (Abbe Sieyes quote p 76) vi. Disadvantage – Only makes it harder for legislation to be passed c. How is bicameralism being phased out? (give examples see p 80) III. Powers of both houses a. factors that influence powers in both houses. i. partisan balance ii. party discipline iii. elections for lower house iv. reiterate upper house “procedure” (OVERREPRESENTATION
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Presentation Outline - I II Define unicameralism Define...

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