Soap - Katie Hurst Kevin Sayles Daniel Spence Rachael...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Katie Hurst Kevin Sayles Daniel Spence Rachael Warren
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Abstract This paper describes the steps taken to synthesize soaps out of four common household fats: lard, Crisco, olive oil, and vegetable oil. Two detergents were also synthesized using two different recipes. The soaps and detergents were to be suitable for cleaning up an oil spill, meaning that they would need to be environmentally safe. Following the procedure for making soap, four different soaps were made, each using a different fat. Then two different detergents were made using two different methods. Every soap and detergent had to be vacuum filtrated to extract the solid. The leftover wastewater from each soap and detergent was then run through a computer program called Data Studio in order to determine how much time it took for the pH of each soap or detergent to become neutral. Each soap and detergent was then tested for latherability, cleaning ability, and solubility. Taking all of these characteristics into consideration, the best soap or detergent was determined to be the soap made with vegetable oil.
Background image of page 2
Introduction The main goal of this project was to make and test soaps and detergents in order to decide which one would be best for cleaning up an oil spill and the birds that this oil spill has affected. 1 This was done by testing the environmental impact of all the different types of soaps, detergents, and their wastes. This was necessary in order to ensure that the soap or detergent that this environmental group chose to use was the one best suited for the environment, or made as little environmental impact as possible. Tests for latherability, cleaning ability, and solubility were carried out to determine the properties of each soap or detergent. Titrations were run on the wastewaters of all possible candidates to determine how long it took the different soaps and detergents to reach a neutral pH. Taking all of these properties into consideration, the best soap or detergent was chosen for the environmental group to use.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Introduction  (continued) The process used to make soap is called hydrolysis. This is when an ester is treated with acidic or basic water. This process yields a carboxylic acid and an alcohol. 1 In this case, a triglyceride in the form of either lard, crisco, vegetable oil, or olive oil, was put into a basic solution of sodium hydroxide. This resulted in the sodium salt of the fatty acid, which is the soap. The carboxylic acid region is the hydrophilic end, and the chain from the fatty acid is the hydrophobic end. 1
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 26

Soap - Katie Hurst Kevin Sayles Daniel Spence Rachael...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online