CSCI6268L35 - Foundations of Network and Computer Security...

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Foundations of Network and Foundations of Network and Computer Security Computer Security J J ohn Black Lecture #35 Dec 7 th 2009 CSCI 6268/TLEN 5550, Fall 2009
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IEEE 802.11a/b/g A standard ratified by IEEE and the most widely-used in the world Ok, PCS might be a close contender Also called “Wi-Fi” 802.11 products certified by WECA (Wireless Ethernet Compatibility Alliance) Bluetooth is fairly commonplace but not really used for LANs More for PANs (the size of a cubicle) Connect PDA to Cell Phone to MP3, etc.
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Wireless Network Architecture Ad Hoc Several computers form a LAN Infrastructure An access point (AP) acts as a gateway for wireless clients This is the model we’re most used to Available all through the EC, for example
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My Access Point
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War Driving The inherent physical insecurity of wireless networks has led to the “sport” of war-driving Get in your car, drive around, look for open access points with you laptop Name comes from the movie “War Games” Some people get obsessed with this stuff You can buy “war driving kits” on line Special antennas, GPS units to hook to you laptop, mapping software
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More War Driving People use special antennas on their cars It used to be Pringles cans, but we’ve moved up in the world People distribute AP maps War driving contest at BlackHat each year
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Next Time You’re in LA
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What’s the Big Deal? My home access point is wide-open People could steal bandwidth I’m not that worried about it People could see what I’m doing I’m not that worried about it There are ways to lock-down your access point MAC filtering Non-signalling APs and non-default SSIDs Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP)
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MAC Filtering Allow only certain MACs to associate Idea: you must get permission before joining the LAN Pain: doesn’t scale well, but for home users not a big deal Drawback: people can sniff traffic, figure out what MACs are being used on your AP, then spoof their MAC address to get on
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This note was uploaded on 03/11/2010 for the course CS 6268 taught by Professor Black during the Spring '09 term at University of Colombo.

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CSCI6268L35 - Foundations of Network and Computer Security...

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