06-givethemwhattheywant

06-givethemwhattheywant - Give Them What They Want Kenneth...

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Give Them What They Want Kenneth M. Anderson University of Colorado, Boulder CSCI 4448/5448 — Lecture 6 — 09/10/2009 1
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Lecture Goals • Give Them What They Want • Requirements and Use Cases • Emphasize the OO concepts and techniques encountered in Chapter 2 2
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Requirements and Use Cases • Chapter 2 does an excellent job of introducing you to the concepts of requirements and use cases • What’s a requirement? • It’s a speciFc thing your system has to do to work correctly • Who deFnes “correct” behavior? • The customer! • What’s a use case? • A use case describes what your system does to accomplish a particular customer goal • What’s the relationship between them? • Each requirement can be translated into one or more customer goals 3
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The Scenario • Doug has a company that creates custom dog doors; you work for Doug • Todd and Gina are your Frst customers • They want a remote-controlled dog door for their dog, ±ido • In realistic fashion, the book quickly codes up a solution • It is ALWAYS tempting to go straight to coding… humans love solving problems and humans love to create • for developers, what we create is code! 4
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Brooks Intervention • Fred Brooks has written an excellent article on why developers get themselves into trouble when designing/building software systems • It is the ±rst essay in his book called The Mythical Man-Month, an excellent book that has stood the test of time • First published in 1975 • 20th Anniversary edition published in 1995 • The article is called The Tar Pit 5
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The Tar Pit • Developing large systems is “sticky” • Projects emerge from the tar pit with running systems • But most missed goals, schedules, and budgets • “No one thing seems to cause the difFculty--any particular paw can be pulled away. But the accumulation of simultaneous and interacting factors brings slower and slower motion.” • CHAOS Report from Standish Group • 34% of (reported) software development projects hit their estimates in 2002 (up from 28% in 2001) • e.g. many projects fail on some project management dimension • In recent years, the numbers have improved but we still have a long way to go 6
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The Tar Pit, continued • The analogy is meant to convey that • It is hard to discern the nature of the problem(s) facing software development • Brooks begins by examining the basis of software development • e.g. system programming 7
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Evolution of a Program 8 Program Programming System Programming Product Programming System Product 3x 3x 9x
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What makes programming fun? • Sheer joy of creation
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This note was uploaded on 03/11/2010 for the course CSCI 5448 taught by Professor Anderson during the Fall '09 term at Colorado.

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06-givethemwhattheywant - Give Them What They Want Kenneth...

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