Writing+Guide

Writing Guide - 1 1Writing Guide Based on a writing guide by Professor Alan Taylor-A INTRODUCTION-This guide offers information about how you will

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1Writing Guide Based on a writing guide by Professor Alan Taylor. ----------------- A. INTRODUCTION ----------------- This guide offers information about how you will be evaluated and how you can avoid the most common examples of poor writing. In the short run, you will get a better grade for the course if you demonstrate consistent effort and improved writing. In the long run, you will find that an ability to communicate in writing is a rare and valuable skill that will enhance your success in almost any career. Remember that there is no single “right” answer to the questions posed for your papers. In fact, there are several different interpretations that can be derived from your sources. You will be graded on the basis of how persuasively you present your own case. The essence of a persuasive case is reliance on historical evidence : relevant information and examples from the past. Evidence should not be confused with metaphors and analogies to contemporary events or with your own personal experiences and opinions. ------------------------ B. CRITERIA FOR GRADING ------------------------ There are three criteria for grading: (1) Argument: (a) Your presentation of a significant and clearly stated argument/interpretation on the first page; (b) Your presentation in a concluding paragraph of a clear summation of your argument and of the supporting evidence. This does not mean simply repeating your introductory paragraph. (2) Evidence: (a) The development of your argument in a persuasive manner through the body of your paper by mustering evidence found in the assigned readings. (b) Your demonstrated understanding of the information in the readings. (c) Your use of at least the minimum required number of readings. (3) Writing: (a) Your command of grammar, spelling, and clarity of expression in your sentences. (b) Your ability to arrange your sentences into coherent paragraphs with an effective topic sentence. (c) Your ability to develop your argument through a series of paragraphs that flow logically from one to the next. ----------------------- 1
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C. OVERALL GUIDELINES ----------------------- (1) Double-space your lines, and employ white paper. Number your pages and fasten your paper with a staple or paper-clip in the upper left corner. A title page is optional; simply centering the title of your paper and your name at the top of the first page will suffice. Make sure you put your name and your TA’s name on your paper. (2) Proofread your paper before you submit it . Correct your typographical and spelling errors. Refer to your dictionary when in doubt. Running spell-checker won’t catch many common errors. If you are sloppy, you will receive a very poor grade. (3)
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This note was uploaded on 03/11/2010 for the course HIS His004c taught by Professor Kudlic during the Winter '10 term at UC Davis.

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Writing Guide - 1 1Writing Guide Based on a writing guide by Professor Alan Taylor-A INTRODUCTION-This guide offers information about how you will

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