CH14 - An Introduction to Programming with C+, Fifth...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
An Introduction to Programming with C++, Fifth Edition 14 - 1 Chapter 14 Classes and Objects At a Glance Instructor’s Manual Table of Contents Chapter Overview Chapter Objectives Instructor Notes Quick Quizzes Discussion Topics Classroom Activities/Additional Projects Key Terms
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
An Introduction to Programming with C++, Fifth Edition 14 - 2 Lecture Notes Chapter Overview This chapter differentiates between procedure-oriented programming and object-oriented programming. In order to do this, the terminology used in object-oriented programming is introduced. Also, the basic components of object-oriented programming (classes and objects) are introduced and implemented in C++. Chapter Objectives After completing the chapter, the student will be able to: Differentiate between procedure-oriented and object-oriented programming Define the terms used in object-oriented programming Create a class Instantiate an object from a class that you define Create a default constructor Create a parameterized constructor Include methods other than constructors in a class Overload the methods in a class Instructor Notes Object-Oriented Programming You will remember from the previous chapters that currently the two most popular methods used to create computer programs are the procedure-oriented method and the object-oriented method. When using the procedure-oriented method to create a program, the programmer concentrates on the major tasks that the program needs to perform. A programmer using the procedure-oriented method typically assigns each major task to a function, which is the primary component of a procedure-oriented program. Note that you have been using procedure-oriented programming methods up through all of the previous chapters. Unlike the procedure-oriented method, which focuses on the individual tasks the program must perform, the object-oriented method requires the programmer to focus on the objects that a program can use to accomplish its goal. The primary component in an object-oriented program is an object. In this chapter, you will learn more about object-oriented programming and how to create simple object-oriented programs.
Background image of page 2
An Introduction to Programming with C++, Fifth Edition 14 - 3 Unlike the procedure-oriented method of programming, the object-oriented method allows the programmer to use familiar objects to solve problems. The ability to use objects that model things found in the real world makes problem solving much easier. Additionally, because each object is viewed as an independent unit, an object can be used in more than one program, usually with little or no modification. The ability to use an object for more than one purpose saves programming time and money (which is an advantage that contributes to the popularity of object- oriented programming). Object-Oriented Programming Terminology
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/11/2010 for the course CS 343 taught by Professor Katzman during the Spring '09 term at ITT Tech Tucson.

Page1 / 8

CH14 - An Introduction to Programming with C+, Fifth...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online