17 - Personal Ethics & Going Forward - 2

17 - Personal Ethics & Going Forward - 2 - Engineering...

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Engineering and Society: Dr. Gershon Weltman Engineering 183EW, UCLA SEAS Lecture 17 Copyright Gershon Weltman, 2009
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    2 Copyright Gershon Weltman, 2006 Ford Explorer Redux The Supreme Court rejects an appeal of an $83 million verdict.” The justices rejected an appeal from lawyers for Ford Motor Co., who argued that the ($55 million) punitive damages were unfair and unconstitutional because the design of the sports utility vehicle met all governmental and industry safety standards. The jury had been told, however, that Ford could have strengthened the roof and possibly avoided such a catastrophic accident had it spent an extra $20 per vehicle .” Los Angeles Times, December 1, 2009
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    3 Copyright Gershon Weltman, 2006 Engr 183 Personal Ethical Dilemmas Lying and Cheating ~ 40% Stealing and Receiving ~ 35% Teams & Authority ~15% ~ 10% In engineering careers, organizational dilemmas will likely predominate
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    4 Copyright Gershon Weltman, 2006 Organizational Ethics: Team & Project Relationship to Team Members Considerate Behavior Maintaining Communication Keeping Promises Exhibiting Loyalty Interactions with Higher Management Protecting data and results Moving problems upward Protecting team members Use and Abuse of Power Respect for Subordinates Assignments to Jobs and Tasks Dismissals for Cause or Necessity Technical and/or Financial Decisions These actions are most liable to ‘Conflict of Interest’ considerations
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    5 Copyright Gershon Weltman, 2006 Organizational Ethics: Conflict of Interest Typical Situations Hiring or appointing a friend or relative Giving a “pass” to a friend or relative Recommending a solution or a purchase that Benefits you directly Benefits a close friend or relative Test 1: “Who is Harmed?” Are the interests actually in conflict? If so, can the conflicts be fairly reconciled? Test 2: “How Does it Smell?” How does it fit into MY personal ethical framework? Is there a relevant organizational policy? How would my supervisors feel about this? How would I explain it to my friends and family? How would it look in a blog or on the evening news?
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  6 Copyright Gershon Weltman, 2006 Ethics Outside of One’s Career Personal Relationships Opinions and advice Promises and commitments Receiving and distributing information Societal Exchanges Everyday personal interactions Participation in interest groups Participation in online communities Institutional Transactions School assignments and tests Claims for Insurance , Income Tax, etc. Reports to DMV, Police, Etc.
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This note was uploaded on 03/12/2010 for the course ENGR 183 taught by Professor Weltman during the Winter '08 term at UCLA.

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17 - Personal Ethics & Going Forward - 2 - Engineering...

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