Reminder sheet

Reminder sheet - Figure 1-1 The changes in energy, E, that...

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Figure 1-1 The changes in energy, E , that result when two atoms are brought into close proximity. At the separation defined as bond length , maximum bonding is achieved.
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Coulomb’s Law: force and energy are proportional to charges and distance F = q 1 q 2 /r 2 E= q 1 q 2 /r An electron that is closer to more positive charge is more stable There is an optimum distance for stabilization Molecules form in order to minimize energy, because attractive forces exceed repulsions
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Valence shell is a limit of attraction of electrons to the nucleus- more protons = more attraction Heteroatoms have lone pairs in normal bonding due to their electronegativity (N,O,F,Cl) A molecule is polar if there is a covalent bond between an electronegative atom and one that is not so electronegative. The dipole moment points towards the more electronegative atom Rules to Drawing Lewis Structures 1. Draw a skeleton 2. Count the number of available valence electrons 3. Fill in the octets 4. Formal charge : #valence electrons - # dots and sticks
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Reminder sheet - Figure 1-1 The changes in energy, E, that...

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