IR Lecture 6

IR Lecture 6 - IR Lecture 61 February 1 2007 Liberalism IIThe Democratic Peace I The Democratic Peace a History i Kant argued world of all

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IR Lecture 6—1 February 1, 2007 Liberalism, II—The Democratic Peace I. The Democratic Peace a) History i) Kant: argued world of all democracies would be a “perpetual peace” (1) Causal logic: leaders in a democracy constrained by public who does not want to pay a heavy price for going to way (2) He argued democracies are inherently more peaceful than other states (3) This not so true, but what’s true is that liberal democracies don’t fight wars against each other b) Economic and Domestic explanation i) Second level explanation (characteristics of the state) c) Liberal? Democrac? i) Liberal? High individual rights and freedom, right to participation and representation political system ii) Democracy: enfranchisement, executive directly elected or responsible to democratically elected Parliament, elections d) Causal Logics to explain i) Institutional Argument: institutional constrains in democracy make war less likely (1) Public opinion (going back to Kant) because they are responsible to a public that doesn’t tolerate costs of war (2) Constitutional checks and balances, executives are answerable to a legislature that can constrain the ability of an executive to go off to war (3) Decision making spread out among these institutions, making it hard for one individual to make war whereas in an authoritarian state one person can decide to make war (4) Ability of democracies to make credible commitments to one another (a) Democracies are better able to join these int’l institutions and say that they will abide by these institutions since the commitment to an int’l institution has to be ratified by a legislature (5) Argument is not that they always get along, but they can better resolve conflict due to their membership in these institutions and more trust ii) Normative Argument: attributes ideas to values, norms, and ideas attributed to democratic states about how states should behave (1) Norms of compromise barring use of force to resolve conflict
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This note was uploaded on 03/12/2010 for the course GOVT 006 taught by Professor Wallander during the Spring '08 term at Georgetown.

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IR Lecture 6 - IR Lecture 61 February 1 2007 Liberalism IIThe Democratic Peace I The Democratic Peace a History i Kant argued world of all

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