Chapter 14 - Chapter 14 Fluids What is a fluid A substance...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 14 Fluids
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What is a fluid A substance that can flow Liquids (difficult to compress) Gases (easy to compress) Basic properties: Fluids take the form of the container. When shear stress is applied they flow. The molecules in fluids are in constant random motion (Brownian motion). The field of science that describes the fluid motion is called “Fluid Mechanics”
Background image of page 2
Density Mass per unit volume. Unit kg/m 3 . The density can be different at each point of the fluid. An object is uniform if the density is constant at any point of the body A fluid is incompressible if the density does not change as a result of an applied pressure. ρ = m V
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Some examples Interstellar space 10 -20 kg/m 3 Laboratory vacuum 10 -17 kg/m 3 Air (1 atm 20C) 1.21 kg/m 3 Ice 0.917x10 3 kg/m 3 Water 0.998x10 3 kg/m 3 Seawater 1.024x10 3 kg/m 3 Earth 5.5x10 3 kg/m 3 Neutron star 10 18 kg/m 3
Background image of page 4
Pressure Force per unit area (the force is perpendicular to the surface) Scalar : the pressure has the same value in all directions! Units: 1Pa=1N/1m 2 . Other popular units 1 atm = 1 bar = 1.01x10 5 Pa = 760 torr = 14.7 lb/in 2 p = F A
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Some Examples Sea level atm. pressure 10 5 Pa Bottom of the ocean 1.1x10 8 Pa Center of the Earth 4x10 11 Pa Center of the Sun 2x10 16 Pa
Background image of page 6
Fluids at rest Static equilibrium F 2 = F 1 + mg F 1 = p 1 A F 2 = p 2 A p 2 A = p 2 A + ρ Vg V = A ( y 1 - y 2 ) p 2 = p 1 + g ( y 1 - y 2 ) p = p 0 + gh Hydrostatic pressure
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Absolute pressure = total pressure Gauge pressure = total - atmospheric The atmospheric pressure on the free surface of a liquid is often neglected. p
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/12/2010 for the course PHY 2049 taught by Professor Any during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

Page1 / 27

Chapter 14 - Chapter 14 Fluids What is a fluid A substance...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online