Lecture_4_Blackboard_Decision_Making

Lecture_4_Blackboard_Decision_Making -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    MANAGERIAL DECISION MAKING Dr. Polly Parker Semester 2, 2005
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Reading for this lecture Chapter 5 Pay particular attention to pp. 132-38
Background image of page 2
    Overview of Lecture Making The Rational Model and some definitions Simon and Limits of Rationality 10 MINUTE BREAK Creativity in decision making Group Decision Making
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Basic Definitions and Terms Decision Making  – process by which managers identify problems and try to  resolve them Programmed decisions  – for routine, well-structured situations that allow pre- determined decision rules Non-programmed decisions  – pre-determined decision rules impractical due to novel  situation Risk Possibility that chosen decision can lead to loss rather than  intended results
Background image of page 4
    Decision Making
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Context – managing complexity ‘Management is about coping with complexity … Managerial  processes must be as close as possible to fail-safe and risk- free’ (Kotter, 1992) Problem – how to ensure large numbers in organisation, facing  similar circumstances behave in identical or similar fashion Involves – establishing rules, procedures, policies and accepted  rational decision making processes (including who can make what  decision)  Key issue – standardisation in response; fine for most routine  (programmed) decisions Decision Making processes aimed at rational, standard  response fine for routine (programmed) decision but not ‘non- programmed’ decisions (i.e. dealing with crisis or opportunity)
Background image of page 6
    History of Business Decision Making Founders of modern business thought (Taylor, Babbage, the Du  Ponts) shared normative view – one best way Top-down decision tree – separation strategic and operational  decisions  subordinates apply policies within carefully defined rules Produced entire academic discipline – decision science  (management information system – see pp. 45-46 of Chap. 2) Led to “decision support systems” (DSS) – ‘interactive computer- based systems intended to help decision makers use data [to] …  solve problems and make decisions’ (Power, 2001) Eg spell-check systems assist in deciding word or grammar   Widely used in agricultural, retailing and transport sectors 1978 – Herbert Simon wins Nobel Prize for pointing out failings  rational decision making models
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 23

Lecture_4_Blackboard_Decision_Making -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online