Lecture_11___Managing_Change

Lecture_11___Managing_Change - ManagingChange Lecture11

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    Managing Change Lecture 11 Management Concepts, 2005  A/Prof. Bradley Bowden
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    Reading Text NOT particularly strong for this  topic, but Read: 580-86, paying particular attention to Kurt  Lewin and his ideas 587-93 598-99
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    Organisation of Lecture First Hour Why Change Management is Important Kurt Lewin and Foundations of Change  Management Strategies for Change and Overcoming  Resistance Second Hour Forces for Change Cultural Change Conflict and Change
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    Why Change Management is  Important
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    Why NOT to change Change costs money It involves disruption (both for business and  staff) Constant change produces ‘survivor- syndrome’ – just aim to survive It can lead to loss of long-standing advantage  (ie Coca-Cola’s recipe change) Costs of change can be more than benefits Should NOT change simply because of  fashion, because everyone else is, or  because of technology
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    Why Manage Change? Most change is incremental But if left unmanaged it can lead business away from what it  does best Major change can involve: New employment relationships Out-sourcing Organisational restructure Job losses New ethical principles Change in typically means doing ‘more with less’ Successful change involves increased motivation among those  involved in process, rather than less
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    Why Change? Organisations change (or should change) because  perceived gap between desired performance levels  and those currently achieved May involve desire for improved organisational effectiveness May involve desire for improved organisational efficiency May involve need for better ethical standards; different  cultural values First step in change: identify performance gap Second step is identifying ‘desired future’ Beginning of ‘chain cycle’ whose final stage is  ‘evaluation against desired outcomes’
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    The change cycle 1. Performance gap 2. Identify a desired future 3. Recognise need for change 4. Problem diagnosis 5. Development of alternatives 6. Selection of appropriate alternatives 7. Implementation 8. Evaluation against desired outcomes
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    Why Organisations and People  Oppose change ‘Change is intensely personal. For change to occur in  any organisation, each individual must think, feel, or  do something different … Change is fundamentally  about feelings’ (Harvard Business Review, 1998, pp.  56, 66) Individual employees oppose change because of  perceived self-interest (more to lose than gain) Also oppose change because fear they will not be  able to adjust, or because of misunderstandings /  poor communication Managers oppose change because they fear loss of  power
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Lecture_11___Managing_Change - ManagingChange Lecture11

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