In part 1 of this experiment a sample of NaOH was standardized with KHP in order to determine the ex

In part 1 of this experiment a sample of NaOH was standardized with KHP in order to determine the ex

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In part 1 of this experiment a sample of NaOH was standardized with KHP in order to determine the exact concentration of NaOH. To do this 3 samples of KHP were taken and their masses recorded and then they were mixed with DI water. Phenolphthalin was added. The KHP solutions were then titrated with NaOH solution and the molarity of the NaOH solutions were calculated using the data gathered. A possible source of error in this experiment could have arisen from the NaOH solution reacting with CO2 in the air to produce carbondic acid. This could have lead to a wrong concentration. H+ + OH- -> H2O In part 2 of this experiment we attempted to determine the concentration of acetic acid in vinegar. We did this by titrating a solution of vinegar and with NaOH until the solution reached the end point (pink color change). Using the amount of NaOH needed and its molarity, we determined the number of moles of NaOH used and thus the number
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Unformatted text preview: of moles of acetic acid in vinegar. Possible sources of error could have arisen from the NaOH solution reacting with CO2 in the air. H+ + OH- -> H2O In part 3 of this experiment we attempted to determine the amount of active ingredient contained in a tums antacid tablet. We did this by back titrating a solution of tums and HCl and thymol blue indicator with NaOH. By finding the excess HCl in the solution, we were able to calculate how much CaCO3 was in the tums tablet. We determined that the % of composition of active ingredient in our two antacid tablets were 39.27% and 36.33%. Possible sources of error could have arisen from the NaOH solution reacting with CO2, or from adding too much or too little of the NaOH during titration. Both could have led to wrong concentrations. H+ + OH- -> H2O...
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This note was uploaded on 03/14/2010 for the course CHEM 109A 109A taught by Professor Aue during the Spring '09 term at UCSB.

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