EEMB 170

EEMB 170 - EEMB170 15:05 HPSInstructor:MarkPage MSRB2401...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
EEMB 170 15:05 HPSInstructor: Mark Page  MSRB 2401 Alex Lowe MSRB 1208 Alena alenakohn@gmail.com Lecture: 8-9:20 T R Lab: 3-6pm @ ML 1004 T R Discussion: 2-3 R @ ML 1004 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
15:05 General Ocean Features Origin of the Ocean Basins o 1912 o Alfred Wegener German meteorologist Continental drift Pangea – supercontinent 225 mya Break up of continents Evidence: Correspondence of Atlantic coastlines of S. America and Africa Mesosaurus – in Brazil and S. Africa Geological – ancient rock Plate tectonics o Sea floor spreading centers New crust produced 30000-100000 years to move one mile Ocean circulation o Factors that influence patterns Coriolis effect Hit continents Changes in prevailing winds
Background image of page 2
15:05 Irregularities of coastline Create local eddies Eckman transport N. Hemisphere – water mass deflected to right Net deeper water movement is at right angles to surface winds Shoreline changes o Long term processes – sea level o Short term processes Influence the configuration of shoreline Waves o Parts of a wave Wave height (H) – distance between crest and trough Wave length (L) – distance between adjacent crests Wave period (T) – time for crest to travel one wave length  Wave speed (C) – L/T o Principles of Waves Studies carried out in wave channel  Aquarium Paddle on one side Creates disturbance
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
15:05 With gentle disturbance o Sine wave o Low H Increase disturbance o Waves more peaked H/L > 1/7  Wave breaks Called wave steepness Particles in wave travel in circular pattern in direction of wave  advance Diameter of circle is about equal to wave height Diameter decreases as particle goes deeper o Deep water wave o Depth (d) = L/2 Close to shore o Particles become more elliptical as it reaches bottom o Particles eventually move side to side as it reaches bottom Surge o Bottom influences movement o Shallow water wave d < L/2 Wave formation
Background image of page 4
15:05 Formed from a disturbance 1. Wind – most important 2. Other – landslides, boats 3. Seismic sea waves o Characteristics Long wave length Could be 150 miles Height low in deep water Very high velocity Could be 500 mph o Indian ocean earthquake Waves up to 100 ft high 225000 people killed in 11 countries Size of wind waves 1. Wind velocity 2. Duration 3. Fetch  Extent of open water across which wind blows Swell in deep water d > L/2 Wave speed (c) = L/T Wave approaches shore
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
15:05 Reflection Wave reflects back on itself
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 24

EEMB 170 - EEMB170 15:05 HPSInstructor:MarkPage MSRB2401...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online