lecture11

lecture11 - Beggingthequestion An argument begs the...

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Begging the question An argument begs the question when it assumes the point to be proved . Example: The defendant is not guilty of the crime, for she is innocent of having committed it. This argument is unconvincing – the conclusion is just a restatement of the premise. If you weren’t already convinced of the conclusion, you wouldn’t accept the premise. The argument is circular .
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Begging the question In other cases, the conclusion won’t restate the premises but the arguer will rely on the truth of the conclusion to establish the premises. Example: I know that everything I clearly and distinctly perceive is true because there is a God, and God would not deceive me. I know that God exists and would not deceive me because I clearly and distinctly perceive that there’s a God who would not deceive me. This is a paraphrase of an argument from Descartes’ Meditations
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Begging the question Note that question-begging arguments are often valid and may also be sound: (1) … (2) … (3) P (4) … So, (5) P If one of the premises is just the conclusion then the argument will certainly be valid. Arguments are supposed to
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lecture11 - Beggingthequestion An argument begs the...

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