lecture12

lecture12 - False Dilemma The fallacy of false dilemma is...

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    False Dilemma The fallacy of false dilemma is committed when a premise unjustifiably reduces the number of alternatives to be considered. Consider: Edgar doesn’t believe in God, so he must be an atheist. There seems to be an unstated premise here: you’re either an atheist or a theist. But this premise ignores a third option: Edgar could be agnostic.
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    False Dilemma A famous example: Every nation in every region now has a decision to make. Either you are with us, or you are with the terrorists. From this day forward any nation that continues to harbor or support terrorism will be regarded by the United States as a hostile regime. (George Bush, 20 th Sep 2001)
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    Taken as an argument, there is a key premise: you’re either with us, or with the terrorists. And the conclusion seems to be that if you’re not with us, you’ll be regarded as an enemy of the United States. However this ignores the possibility that a nation could be neither with the US or with the terrorists. In general, we expose a false dilemma by pointing out a possibility that is being ignored.
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    False Dilemma Note that false dilemmas have a valid form:
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This note was uploaded on 03/14/2010 for the course PHIL 3 taught by Professor Way during the Fall '08 term at UCSB.

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lecture12 - False Dilemma The fallacy of false dilemma is...

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