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lecture13

lecture13 -

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Homework, due Wednesday 7 th April 7.4 C 1-10. 8.1 A 1-5, C 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 8.2 A 1-5 C 1, 3, 5, 9 8.3 A 1-5 C 2, 4, 6, 10
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False Cause ‘False cause’ is an umbrella term for a variety of errors people make in reasoning about causal connections. These errors all involve assuming a causal connection between events that probably does not exist. There are five types of false cause fallacy: post hoc ergo propter hoc non causa pro causa oversimplified cause slippery slope Gambler’s fallacy
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Post hoc ergo propter hoc This is Latin for ‘after this, therefore on account of this’. This fallacy is commited when it is fallaciously inferred that because an event B happened after A, A caused B. Ex. Just months after George W.Bush was elected to his first term, terrorists committed the worst ever attack on American soil. Just months after he was reelected, there was Hurrican Katrina, one of the worst natural disasters ever to befall an American city . Obviously, Bush’s being elected to office leads to terrible misfortunes.
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Non cause pro cause More Latin: ‘not the cause of the cause’. In these cases, one event is taken to be the cause of another, but not because of temporal succession. A clear example is when causes are confused with effects: Ex. Every time the thermometer rises, the temperature goes up. It seems that the thermometer’s going up causes the temperature to rise. The best athletes earn big salaries. To make Jones a great athlete, we should pay him more.
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Oversimplified cause This fallacy occurs when an event has multiple causes, but the arguer only focuses on (a possible) one of them: Ex. The scores on standardized tests have been dropping
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This note was uploaded on 03/14/2010 for the course PHIL 3 taught by Professor Way during the Fall '08 term at UCSB.

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lecture13 -

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