Acceptance of Populations - Minority Groups US History.doc...

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Running head: ACCEPTANCE OF POPULATIONS: MINORITY GROUPS 1 Acceptance of Populations: Minority Groups U. S. History Colorado State University – Global Campus September 21, 2017
ACCEPTANCE OF POPULATIONS: MINORITY GROUPS 2 Acceptance of Populations: Minority Groups Slide 1 British settlers made up most of the white population of colonial America. After the American Revolution and as the Industrial Revolution came into action, immigration increased dramatically. Many of the new immigrants were minorities in America. Irish and German people who came to America for a better life were minorities. Africans brought to America for slavery were among the lowest forms of minority cultures. Native Americans who were in America long before the British became a minority after the English brought disease and killed many of them for their land. These groups of people were shunned by the early colonial settlers. The settlers believed that these groups of people were inferior to them either racially, ethnically and academically. There are many facts that contradict the stereotypes and prejudices that these groups endured. Slide 2 The Irish were a proud group of people who came to America to live the “American Dream”. There were many stereotypes about the Irish. The Irish were mostly Roman Catholics. Many people thought that their religious beliefs gave way for excessive breeding. Protestants feared that the Irish had large families as a ploy to take over America and push their religion on everyone. They were considered trouble-makers because there were more Irish arrested than other ethnic groups at the time. They were thought to be alcoholics who liked to fight – people thought they were meaner when they were drunk. Irish people were prejudiced against African- Americans. They often competed with Blacks for jobs and treated them as though they were
ACCEPTANCE OF POPULATIONS: MINORITY GROUPS 3 inferior. African-Americans returned the sentiments saying that the Irish were taking any of the jobs that a free colored man could get. The truth is that many Irish people were unskilled workers that helped build the canals and railroads that became so important to the American economy. They also labored in textile mills and farming, sometimes for the Southern planters. Some Irish became wealthy by finding opportunities such as opening department stores, meat packing plants, and the arts.

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