9 Gowan - http://eth.sagepub.com Ethnography DOI:...

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Unformatted text preview: http://eth.sagepub.com Ethnography DOI: 10.1177/1466138102003004007 2002; 3; 500 Ethnography Teresa Gowan The Nexus: Homelessness and Incarceration in Two American Cities http://eth.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/3/4/500 The online version of this article can be found at: Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com can be found at: Ethnography Additional services and information for http://eth.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://eth.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://eth.sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/3/4/500 SAGE Journals Online and HighWire Press platforms): (this article cites 6 articles hosted on the Citations 2002 SAGE Publications. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use or unauthorized distribution. at UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN on January 2, 2008 http://eth.sagepub.com Downloaded from The nexus Homelessness and incarceration in two American cities Teresa Gowan University of Manchester, UK A B S T R A C T Using street ethnography and interviews with homeless men in San Francisco and St Louis, this article examines the dynamic connection between incarceration and homelessness. Among the homeless men in the study, crimes of desperation, aggressive policing of status offenses, and the close proximity of many ex-cons created a strong likelihood of incarceration and reincarceration. Conversely, for jail and prison inmates, time inside consistently eroded employability, family ties, and other defences against homelessness: several of the men had become homeless for the first time directly following release from a carceral establishment. Each of these dynamics was present in both San Francisco and St Louis but the process of becoming homeless and the experience of homelessness itself varied significantly with the differing economic and cultural configurations presented by the two cities. In both cases, each trajectory reinforced the other, creating a homelessness/incarceration cycle more powerful than the sum of its parts, a racialized exclusion/punishment nexus which germinates, isolates, and perpetuates lower-class male marginality. K E Y W O R D S homelessness, poverty, incarceration, crime, quality- of-life policing, masculinities, neoliberalism, United States graphy Copyright 2002 SAGE Publications (London, Thousand Oaks, CA and New Delhi) Vol 3(4): 500534[14661381(200212)3:4;500534;029018] A R T I C L E 2002 SAGE Publications. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use or unauthorized distribution. at UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN on January 2, 2008 http://eth.sagepub.com Downloaded from In both the public sphere and academia, representations of male ex-convicts and of homeless men are quite different, but in practice there is much continuity between the two groups. Several recent surveys of shelter users and the street homeless report that between 40 and 80 percent of male respondents have spent time in jail or prison (OFlaherty, 1996: 31114).respondents have spent time in jail or prison (OFlaherty, 1996: 31114)....
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9 Gowan - http://eth.sagepub.com Ethnography DOI:...

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