Lecture 22 Study Guide

Lecture 22 Study Guide - Lecture 22 Study Guide 1. How do...

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Lecture 22 Study Guide 1. How do organisms become airborne? a. Five styles of becoming airborne i. Passive flight 1. Surface area bigger than mass 2. Can be carried around ii. Descent 1. Parachuting 2. Gliding a. Gains more horizontal distance iii. Ascent 1. Soaring a. Active Soaring i. Flies close to water surface ii. Catch movement of wind iii. Uplifting by wind iv. Must plan before b. Passive soaring i. Locate area of uplifting wind 2. Powered flight (flapping) b. Specialized chest i. Internal muscle layer 1. Smaller 2. Raises the limb ii. External
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1. Flaps wing 2. What are the three groups of active vertebrate fliers? a. Birds i. Hummingbirds 1. Flaps wings front and back a. Instead of up and down 2. 20kg heaviest for flying birds b. Pterosaur i. Smallest a foot ii. Biggest about 10m c. Bat i. Smallest a few gram ii. Largest is 1.5kg 1. 1.8m wing span 2. Flying Fox 3. What is Archaeopteryx ? a.
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This note was uploaded on 03/15/2010 for the course GEL GEL 107 taught by Professor Jishin during the Winter '09 term at UC Davis.

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Lecture 22 Study Guide - Lecture 22 Study Guide 1. How do...

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