BIS104 Slide15

BIS104 Slide15 - Lecture 15 Cancer (continued) Cancer...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 15 Cancer (continued)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cancer progression and metastasis
Background image of page 2
Most human cancers are not caused by viruses (or bacteria), but are results of somatic mutations A few exceptions: 1) Hepatitis B virus -> liver cancer 2) Helicobacter pylori -> ulcer -> stomach cancer 3) Human papilloma virus cervical cancer GARDISIL: vaccine containing recombinant HPV proteins Figure 20-11 Molecular Biology of the Cell (© Garland Science 2008)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
If most human cancers are caused by somatic mutations what kind of genes are mutated in human cancers? Same set of proto-oncogenes (c- oncogenes) first discovered by analysis of retroviruses
Background image of page 4
+ DNA from normal cells Using DNA from normal cells, nothing much happens… Transfection assay to detect activated oncogenes
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
= c-Ras Using DNA from tumor, recipient cells become cancer-like. Clone the specific gene involved
Background image of page 6
SOS DNA from human bladder tumor has a mutant version of c-Ras, v-Ras , which has a Val 61 to Glycine mutation, resulting in lower GTPase activity than wild-type c-Ras, stays ON longer Similar in Rat Sarcoma Virus: has v-Ras version of c-Ras, v-Ras has gly 12 to val mutation lower GTPase activity than c-Ras, stays on longer
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Is the V61G mutation in bladder cancer v-Ras an inherited or somatic mutation ? Sequenced normal tissue from same patient Wild-type c-Ras Sequenced parents’ family members’ DNA Wild-type c-Ras ---> SOMATIC MUTATION !!!
Background image of page 8
Major signaling pathway relevant to cancer in human cells Figure 20-37 Molecular Biology of the Cell (© Garland Science 2008)
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
e.g. c-Ras in bladder cancers Three ways to convert proto-oncogenes (the normal version) into oncogenes Figure 20-33 Molecular Biology of the Cell (© Garland Science 2008)
Background image of page 10
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
human EGF-like receptor HER2 heregulin HER2 over- expressed in many breast cancers
Background image of page 12
e.g. c-Ras in bladder cancers e.g. HER2 in breast cancers and c-Myc in some cancers Three ways to convert proto-oncogenes (the normal version) into oncogenes Figure 20-33 Molecular Biology of the Cell (© Garland Science 2008)
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 14
Figure 17-62 Molecular Biology of the Cell (© Garland Science 2008)
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 16
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 52

BIS104 Slide15 - Lecture 15 Cancer (continued) Cancer...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 16. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online