CalcReview

CalcReview - Econ 100A: Intermediate Microeconomics...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Econ 100A: Intermediate Microeconomics University of California, Santa Cruz January 2010
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Introduction Econ 100A: Intermediate Microeconomics Welcome to Econ 100A!!! Quarter : Winter 2009 Professor: Ryan Oprea Email: roprea@ucsc.edu Teaching Assistants :Mahir Binici, Aadil Nakhoda Email: mbinici@ucsc.edu, anakhoda@ucsc.edu
Background image of page 2
Calculus Review In this course, we will be solving our problems with the help of some calculus. There are some basic rules that we all should know. Take a look at my calculus review sheet posted online. We will be mostly using the following in the course. Basic Di/erentiation Partial Di/erentiation Product Rule We di/erentiate a function in order to measure how much a function changes as a variable changes. In other words,we di/erentiate to obtain the rate at which a function changes when an input variable changes by one unit. Furthermore,di/erentiation is an important tool to use to determine tangency points.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Some equations that may be useful to know. We can write our utility function (indi/erence curve) as: U ( x 1 , x 2 ) = x 4 1 x 5 2 (1) where x 1 and x 2 are two goods. Our production function as: f ( x 1 , x 2 ) = x 1 2 1 x 1 2 2 (2) where x 1 and x 2 are two inputs Now in order to solve the problems we will need to use di/erentiation.
Background image of page 4
Some equations that may be useful to know. A utility function will have a budget constraint associated with it: m = p 1 x 1 + p 2 x 2 (3) where p 1 and p 2 are the prices of goods 1 and 2 respectively. m is income. A production function will have a cost function (iso-cost line)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/16/2010 for the course ECON 100A taught by Professor Justinmarion during the Spring '08 term at UCSC.

Page1 / 19

CalcReview - Econ 100A: Intermediate Microeconomics...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online