Anthropology

Anthropology - WEEK ONE Anthropology Anthropos(human logos(study This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of human biology

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WEEK ONE Anthropology: Anthropos (human) logos (study) This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of human biology, culture, and society. It explores the similarities and differences in the ways the human beings cope with the natural environment and each other. By examining how different peoples sustain themselves, mate and have children, cooperate and fight with one another, and deal with the inevitability of death, we will try to reach a better understanding of ourselves and what it is to be human. Main ideas: Humans are biologically similar and culturally diverse. The human capacity for cultural diversity is rooted in our common humanity -- our shared biology. Cultural diversity is patterned. Anthropology is the comprehensive science of what it is to be human. Anthropology studies the character of human diversity and unity, both past and present, and both biological and cultural. Physical Anthropology -- Humans as biological beings: o Human origins and evolution, human biology and physiology, human genetic variation, other primates (prosimians, monkeys, apes) Cultural Anthropology -- Humans as cultural beings: o Archaeology -- process of social and technological change over a large time scale. o Linguistic Anthropology -- structure and change of language, language, culture, and society. o Ethnology (Social and Cultural Anthropology) relationships to the environment: subsistence, technology, science; relationships to other humans: exchange, kinship, social structure, politics, law, religion. What kind of discipline is anthropology? Popular conception: o Adventurer, misfit, eccentric, hangs out with other species, hangs out in exotic places. Anthropological perspective: o holistic - multidisciplinary study of how different aspects of life fit together. o diachronic - studies change over time. o comparative o faith in comprehensibility Anthropological practice: o by immersion o meanings as well as measurement o observation as well as experiment o humanistic as well as scientific o small scale as well as complex societies o advocacy as well as analysis What does anthropology share with the other social sciences? What distinguishes anthropology from the other social sciences?
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Anthropology : the study of man, specifically the science of the human organism, the science of man in relation to physical character, the origin and classification of races, environmental and social relations, and culture. Sociology : the science of the constitution, phenomena, and development of society. Sociologists use survey instruments, census records, large masses of quantitative information to gain an insight into the nature of complex, mass society. Anthropologists tend to use participant observation and in depth interviews to gain insight into one small
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This note was uploaded on 03/16/2010 for the course ANTH 1006 taught by Professor Boster, j during the Fall '08 term at UConn.

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Anthropology - WEEK ONE Anthropology Anthropos(human logos(study This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of human biology

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