Unit 9 2010 - Unit 9: Persuasive Messages Unit 9 of...

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Unit 9: Persuasive Messages
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Copyright, Carolyn E. Kerr, 2009 9-2 Unit Table of Contents Unit 9: Persuasive Messages . ................................................................................................................... 9-1 Unit Objectives . ...................................................................................................................................... 9-3 Simplifying the Complex . ....................................................................................................................... 9-3 The Indirect Organizational Plan for Persuasive Messages . .................................................................. 9-4 Common Types of Persuasive Messages . .............................................................................................. 9-6 Persuasive Message Checklist . ............................................................................................................ 9-12 It’s Your Turn Practice Activities . ...................................................................................................... 9-13 Learning Check Assignment Description . .......................................................................................... 9-14 Endnotes . ............................................................................................................................................. 9-15 Unit 9: Persuasive Messages
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Copyright, Carolyn E. Kerr, 2009 9-3 Unit Objectives To understand the indirect organizational plan for persuasive messages To understand the elements of a persuasive message To understand justifying a request (making the case) To understand the call to action Simplifying the Complex Over the years, several different textbooks have been used for the Fundamentals of Business Communication course. In reviewing some of those textbooks, it was surprising just how much repetition there is. To be fair, in instructional design, repetition is usually a good thing. Hearing things multiple times helps people to remember it. Many textbooks seem to think that each chapter has to be equally weighty in order to sufficiently reinforce the material. (Okay, let’s be honest, it also helps them try to justify their textbook prices.) By the time those other textbooks reach the subject of Persuasive Messages, they have covered pretty much the same topics that are in this guide. It seems silly, then, to have another lengthy discussion on making your case and overcoming objections. You learned about audience analysis and being persuasive back in unit two. And you read about persuasion in presentations in unit seven. This unit, then, will focus on things you haven’t heard about and refer you back to the general business communication guidelines you have been mastering this term. Unit 9: Persuasive Messages
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Copyright, Carolyn E. Kerr, 2009 9-4 The Indirect Organizational Plan for Persuasive Messages In the last unit, you learned that you can be direct in your message when it is routine or good news. That should have helped you assume that you will not typically use the direct plan when you are asking for something bigger or trying to persuade someone to act or think as you want. Interestingly, many business communications textbooks will tell you that it’s acceptable – even preferable to continue to use the direct organizational plan when you are communicating with a superior. That seems overly simplistic. If other texts truly believed in the audience analysis they promote, they would say that the answer is: it depends. Keep that in mind as you decide whether you can be that direct with your superiors. Virtually everyone agrees, however, that when you are communicating with peers, subordinates or outside of your organization, you need to use the indirect organizational plan. The elements in that plan are given an acronym for easy recall by John V. Thill and Courtland L. Bovée 34 . They call this approach the “AIDA” model, which stands for Attention, Interest, Desire, Action.
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This note was uploaded on 03/16/2010 for the course BUSORG 1101 taught by Professor Neff during the Spring '08 term at Pittsburgh.

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Unit 9 2010 - Unit 9: Persuasive Messages Unit 9 of...

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