EST 330 Notes for Monday April 24th 2006

EST 330 Notes for Monday April 24th 2006 - EST 330 Notes:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
EST 330 Notes: Monday April 24, 2006: Flash Floods: -Cause more deaths but less economic damage than riverine floods -Fast onset, short duration from minutes to hours -Often occur without warning due to intense localized rains (thunderstorms) -Usually produce a debris flow (trees, structures, other debris act like a bulldozer) -Occur in mountain streams (no flood plains), narrow canyons, and caves -The absorption capabilities of the ground is very important -Southwestern States: they occur in dry rocky river beds called anoyos -Flash floods can travel several miles per hour, usually faster than people can run -Can result from the failure of a dam or an ice-jam release -Potential of a Flash Flood Exist anywhere there is: 1. Step terrain 2. High runoff rate (poor absorption) 3. Streams existing in narrow canyons 4. High occurrence of thunderstorms -Thunderstorms are the primary source of flash floods -Logging and fires increase the chance of flash floods by removing the capability to hold soil down and cause absorption rates to lower
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/16/2010 for the course EST 330 taught by Professor Paulsiegel during the Fall '09 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

Page1 / 2

EST 330 Notes for Monday April 24th 2006 - EST 330 Notes:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online