{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Civil_War_Seapower - CIVIL WAR 1861-1865 Strategy and...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 CIVIL WAR 1861-1865 Strategy and Application of Sea Power in the Civil War
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Learning Objectives The role of the Union Navy in the strategy for defeat of the Confederacy The role of the Confederate Navy in the strategy for defeat of the Union Vital importance of European allies in South’s naval strategy Innovations in weapons and technology
Image of page 2
Civil War Background Balance of Power Naval Comparison Common Operational Heritage Confederate States Navy Union Navy
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Diplomacy North’s Goal British neutrality South’s Diplomacy Goal: Win British recognition and aid “ King Cotton theory Not to necessarily defeat the North, but to break the will of the Northern forces to continue fighting Problems Outcome
Image of page 4
Trent Affair November 8, 1861 James M. Mason and John Slidell, representing the South, board an English ship, the HSS Trent . Their motive is to compel the English to aid the South in the War.
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Trent Affair (cont’d) Union Captain Charles Wilkes, commanding the San Jacinto , intercepts the Trent at Sea, and boards her. North wants to take Mason and Slidell as prisoners. English refuses, but North prepares to fire on the Trent, and the English give in. Mason and Slidell are taken to Boston Harbor as prisoners.
Image of page 6
Trent Affair (con’t) England is outraged and threatens to go to war. President Lincoln formally apologizes to Britain, and denies any knowledge or sanction, by the government, in the matter. Furthermore, Mason and Slidell are released, and Britain backs down.
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Significance North dodges bullet by resolving the Trent Affair peacefully with Britain. If England had entered the war, it would have ended the chances of the North to defeat the South.
Image of page 8
Northern Strategy - “Anaconda Plan” Blockade Southern coast Bombardment and amphibious assault of ports for advanced bases Control Mississippi River (Riverine operations) Combined Army-Navy ops
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Southern Strategy Coastal Defense Blockade breaking Blockade running Commerce Raiding Privateers Confederate States Navy No prize courts
Image of page 10
Naval Situation-1861 South depended on cotton South had virtually no industry If north accomplished goal then the South would wither and die Union policy: “Anaconda” “Choke” trade and commercial life of the South
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Naval Situation-1861 Effect of blockade policy on the South 1864: 1 gold dollar was worth 2,000 Confederate dollars At the outbreak the North was not well equipped to suit their goals Under leadership of Sec. Nav. Gideon Welles the navy grew exponentially
Image of page 12
Naval Situation-1861 The union navy had only 42 ships in commission with 7,600 men South: Few shipyards, weak industrial base, no veteran sailors
Image of page 13

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Sec. Nav. Gideon Welles Instrumental in building navy up to meet its goals of blockading thousands of miles of southern ports
Image of page 14
C.S.A. Sec. Nav., Stephen Mallory Played very key role for south buy helping institute ironclads in southern navy.
Image of page 15

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 16
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern