Seapower_to_1763 - Insert / Extract ISR Mission Description...

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Mission Description Insert / Extract Inserts – Air land INFIL, Air land EXFIL, and FASTROPE Insertion ISR Squirter – Reconnaissance (Infil to Exfil) of SOF targets and squirter control CAS – Fire support for TIC CASEVAC – Integrated medical teams Resupply / Logistics – Transport of material to remote FOBs
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Area of Operations
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Sea Power Introduction and Early Navies
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Course Outline • The Navy as an instrument of Foreign Policy • Interaction between Congress and Navy • Interservice Relations • Technology • Strategy and Tactics • Naval Doctrine • Prospects for the future
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In the Beginning…. • Why boats and ships? Mobility Trade/Barter Products Exchange Ideas . ..
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First Use of Seas …Trade. .. • Where?? Europe Africa Asia MED
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Early Navies … Why? • Initially: Ships with trade goods: -- Pirates / Piracy designate certain -- Competition ships to carry soldiers • Later: 2 Types of ships developed: -- “Round Ship” for cargo -- “Long Ship” or “Galley” beginning of Navies
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Principal Functions of Navies?? 1. Protect your sea communications 2. Block or disrupt you enemy’s sea communications - To protect one’s own goods and men and disrupt the enemies ability to do so. 1. Defend against seaborne attack 2. Isolate the enemy 3. Carry the attack across the sea to the enemy
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CRETE 2500 - 1200 BC • Why did it become a Mediterranean sea power? 1. Dense and growing population 2. Mountainous, inhospitable geography Pressure to make living at sea Strategic location … 1. To carry commerce 2. To attack and limit the maritime operations of its rivals
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Phoenicians 2000 - 300 BC • Took the mantle of “sea power” from Crete • Established flourishing maritime trade … • Search for customers and raw materials … they became the first great colonizers of ancient times … trade centers became centers of civilization … Carthage
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Greece • By 5th Century BC -- Greeks choked out Phoenicians and Carthaginians in the Black and Aegean Seas -- held virtual monopoly in the eastern Mediterranean -- coasts of Asia Minor to E. Thrace to N. Sicily and S. Italy virtual extensions of Greece -- Greek settlements as far north as shores of Black Sea and Med. ..... Coasts of Spain and Gaul
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Greco-Persian War • Persia one of a series of empires to dominate Asia • By 6th Cent Persia had expanded to Med. .... and Aegean Seas … Phoenicians quickly surrendered and provided fleets to Persia … • Naval aid from Greece to Greek cities in Asia Minor vital to their resistance … bought time . ..
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• 492 BC : First Persian expedition against the Greeks -- to subdue revolt -- fleet of Persian galleys accompanying Army damaged by storm… -- w/ galleys damaged, cargo ships unprotected . .. Loss of sea communications stopped the expedition
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This note was uploaded on 03/16/2010 for the course NAVSC 102 taught by Professor Hammond during the Spring '08 term at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

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Seapower_to_1763 - Insert / Extract ISR Mission Description...

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