syllabus_2009

syllabus_2009 - Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 100A...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 100A Fall, 2009 Harry Noller Overview: This is a course in the fundamentals of Molecular Biology, from a chemical and structural point of view. It is intended primarily for students planning on a research career. The fundamental principles are stressed, at the expense of myriad biological details. How things are (or have been) discovered and the practice of research is emphasized. Students are responsible for knowing and understanding everything presented in lecture; the text is used as a supporting source for the material. Students are expected to attend lectures and one discussion section per week. There will be assignments that require you to look at molecular structures using molecular graphics software that you will run on a personal computer. The required work includes problem sets, two midterms and a final exam. The class website can be found at http://bio.classes.ucsc.edu/bmb100a/ The TAs this quarter are Michael Pearson and Eric Maklan. Text: Voet & Voet, 3rd edition (page numbers corresponding to each section are given below) Course Outline I. Introduction Careers in BMB Other courses in BMB area B vs. MB Structure-Function Paradigm Central Dogma The three primary kingdoms ("prokaryotes" vs. eukaryotes) Biology 115 (Eukaryotic Molecular Biology) Plan of the Course TAs Sections Topics Prerequisites Review Reading; the Text vs. Lectures Reserve Material
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Problem Sets Exams II. Nucleotides: monomeric building blocks of DNA and RNA (polymers) (80-82;85- 88) the bases structures aromaticity tautomeric forms pK's reactivities ribose and deoxyribose stereochemistry constraints of ring structure phosphate phosphoester linkages and geometry strong negative charge the phosphate-sugar backbone nomenclature bases nucleosides nucleotides oligonucleotides polynucleotides torsion angles III. Weak Interactions (39-43;258-263) What makes macromolecules so special? Complexity and weak interactions. Weak relative to what? Covalent bond energies Free energy and equilibrium constants Bond angles Free rotation vs. restricted rotation Electrostatic (Ionic, Coulombic) interactions Dielectric constant Hydrogen bonding Donors and Acceptors Non-donors and non-acceptors Bond angles
Background image of page 2
Water structure Hydrophobic Interactions Van der Waals interactions Non-interference with water structure Solubilities of compounds in aqueous vs organic solvents Examples How to denature biological macromolecules IV. How the DNA double helix was discovered
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/16/2010 for the course BIOC 100A taught by Professor Harrynoller during the Winter '10 term at UCSC.

Page1 / 12

syllabus_2009 - Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 100A...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online