Lectures 2,3,4 - Introduction to Relational Databases

Lectures 2,3,4 - Introduction to Relational Databases -...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 3/17/10 Database Lectures
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3/17/10 Three Lectures in One The materials in this slide show will be presented in lecture on January 11, 13, and 20 of 2010. They will be augmented and reinforced in the labs of January 15 and 22. Assignment 1, due January 25, is based on these lectures and labs. Examples demonstrating how to do
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Click to edit Master subtitle style 3/17/10 Introduction to Relational Databases In Codd We Trust
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3/17/10 Where they came from
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3/17/10 UM History Dr. Codd and Dr. Michael Stonebraker (PhD, U of M, 1967) are recognized as two of the pioneers in relational database development. One of the earliest database systems incorporating many of their concepts was established here at the U of M in the late 1960’s. It was called “Micro.” It remained in use until the late
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3/17/10 Theory and Practice We will begin by looking at the theory and the terminology of table design. After that, we will focus on the practical side—using Access to: Create a new database Design tables Create relationships That’s what assignment 1 will be about.
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3/17/10 Modern Databases Your reading assignment for this week was the first two chapters of a book called “Databases Demystified.” This book contains a general definition of a database: a database is a collection of interrelated data items that are managed as a single unit.
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3/17/10 DBMS A database is managed, strangely enough, by something called a “database management system” (DBMS). Popular DBMS’s include Oracle, MySql, DB2, and Microsoft’s SQL Server (for large-scale databases) and Access (for smaller databases). Large-scale DBMS’s like Oracle and Midterm Material!
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3/17/10 Access While Access can be used on networks, it is more of a “personal” DBMS, running on the user’s computer instead of a separate server. It stores everything in a single file (*.mdb for Access 2003 and earlier; *.accdb for Access 2007). The single-file feature of Access is why we will use it in this class. It
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3/17/10 Microsoft Access Access is not the best or most powerful DBMS; it is just the most convenient for use in this class. Nevertheless, it is good enough and powerful enough that it serves very nicely as a training database: most of what you need to know about databases you can learn using Access.
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3/17/10 Key Point! Good relational database design is about optimizing how the data is STORED, not how it is DISPLAYED. Most “tables” you have seen—in books, in lectures, on the web—were probably optimized for display, not for storage. Relational database tables are designed for consistency and to Midterm Material!
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3/17/10 Why “relational?” We’ll be learning about database relationships later is this mega- lecture. However, relationships are not what
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Lectures 2,3,4 - Introduction to Relational Databases -...

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