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Field Problems with New High Solids Products

Field Problems with New High Solids Products - FIELD...

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FIELD PROBLEMS WITH NEW HIGH SOLIDS PRODUCTS Kirby Buesing, Technical Service Manager - The Valspar Corporation Source: SSPC, The Society of Protective Coatings Abstract: The trend in the painting industry is moving toward very high solids products to meet VOC regulations. The way we handle, store and apply these products is as much a change as the products themselves. There are a whole new set of rules and problems that this paper presents to help us all deal with the new technology and make it work. For many years, one way to determine whether too much paint had been applied to a vertical surface was by looking for runs and sags. Paint products had enough solvent in them from the factory to give the proper flow characteristics needed for application. On top of this, the old time painter also added a glug or two of thinner to make the product work even better. VOC regulations have caused the industry to make a big change. Many of yesterday's tricks are no longer allowed. The workhorse products of the industry have become epoxies, urethanes and acrylics. The reason is that the epoxies and urethanes have been somewhat easier to formulate as either high solids or water reducible systems. The acrylics or modified acrylic products are either water reducible or low enough in solids that they usually do not cause application or handling problems. High solids epoxies have been around for some thirty plus years. Some of the epoxies from that era were one hundred percent. These products were usually very difficult to apply. They required special plural component equipment because of their short pot life. Most maintenance contractors would not have this expensive equipment in their possession. This limited the use of these products to fixed application sites such as fabrication and manufacturing plants. Some paint manufacturing companies supplied the equipment to the contractor to apply their products. These were usually specialized applications such as riveted tank seam sealing. The new generation high solids epoxies of today still cause field application problems. It is very common to have an intermediate coat be an epoxy with volume solids of seventy, eighty or even ninety percent. The epoxy resin technology has progressed to give us products with higher solids and lower viscosity. This has helped with the application properties, but with the higher resin solids it also requires more pigmentation, which raises the viscosity. The raw material suppliers, coatings manufacturers, application equipment manufacturers, owners and paint contractors have all had to change to meet these requirements.
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