Fceramic

Fceramic - So we have established that there are many different arrangements of atoms in which materials can crystallize Three of the simplest that

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So we have established that there are many different arrangements of atoms in which materials can crystallize. Three of the simplest that we looked at were the simple cubic, BCC and the FCC structures. In each case, many billions of units cells can stack together in 3 dimensions to produce a crystal. In materials engineering, they call these crystals as grains . Grains are equivalent to crystals that have formed with a certain orientation. The size of the crystals is referred to as grain size. This grain size is an important structural parameter. In most cases, we want this to be as small as possible for better properties.
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Crystals Grains When to grains with different orientations meet, they create a grain boundary .
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Crystal Structures in Materials Single Crystals Polycrystalline Anisotropic Isotropic If a material contained only one grain, then the properties will be very different along different planes and directions because the atomic arrangements are different. This is called anisotropy
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This note was uploaded on 03/17/2010 for the course ES 2001 taught by Professor Shivkumar during the Fall '08 term at WPI.

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Fceramic - So we have established that there are many different arrangements of atoms in which materials can crystallize Three of the simplest that

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