ch7_12 - at stake his a aids we must all face mournmc...

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Unformatted text preview: at stake. his a aids we must all face. mournmc . -. l .‘ .1REPORTER. . quunomw ' known. pea-Mui- h.to Hem-“mm.“fiethan- tromdyhavogtm their views on the [autumn-k act-col «2%. Do yen'tthk ouch parse-cliche are duty' bound h~oonflfitonrnda1 hues? Yea. I think such personalities have a duty to their race to pro- : e s t publicly any unfair ad- , vantage t h a t . is being taken! of their peo- p ie.. Louis Armstrong and Tank Younger h_a v e _spoken out a g a i n a t ‘3. segregation be- i.“ _ .. . _. cause they are 1;“: n. ., "‘1: in a position . m be heard by a large numbcr_ l of people. -- NELLIE A‘\'l€l’.‘:’..' sales manager. Peggy's. 4k 4: i There _are, some well—known penom~who haven't yet spokcn , .their views. ".bUL I think i: 5 they should i ‘ . are in a poeio’ tion to knnW' ,many of the ' evils of segre— 'gation and ' enced the difc ticulties. How- " ever.‘ I think these personalities should con- fine their fight‘to their particu- lar field—KAY HALL 'aales- wornan. ' -& i * I think any Negro who is in the spotlight in-any~tieid sh6uld speak up tolet‘ t h e w o r'l d at least is not ‘ satisfied with m'a it r e a t- ment of his have. gained. the respect of fighx the people. usually have an audience When." they speak and this audience ex- pect: them to "stand up and be counted."~—MILDRED HOGAN. .saies clerk. 4r 4! a Football players. baseball play- ers. like persons of the enter- - - t a i n m e n t w 0 rl d , a r e o f t e n ' faced with problems of segregation in their trav- els. In'report- in: these Silil‘ rations I think they should 2o to the proper -_-__-_ -_a ~' because they' her hubby, (\lrtis. have moved back to Paudena from L0: An- gel's. Geraldine has been re- hired by the Board of Education in 'ihe. Extended Day depart- ment and will teach shorthand and typing. Michel Turpeau. younger brother of Rev. D. DeWitt 'l‘ur— peau. pastor of Scott Methodist church. was appointed recently by Senior Senator from Ohio. John W. Brickrr to serve as ad- ministrative consultant to the Board of Veterans .Appeals for the Veterans Administration. The family will move from On- cinnati to establish residence in Washington. D. C. Michel Tur- peau was formerly a member or the Turpeau, Buyan and Houston law firm. The Kenion ‘baby is here and Shirley Lewis is about the hap~ piest grandmother in town. Charles W. White. .Pasadena‘s famous European artist. is pre- paring many new items to he shown when'hia work is present- ed for exhibition in New York later this year. Mr.,and Mrs. White entertained Lou Gilbert. motion picture actor. recently. When the Pasadena Art. Fair was held in Civic Center Plaza last week. Kingsley D. Brock spent many hour-a demonstrating the charcoal and graphic tech- nique for patrons. While vacationing in St. Louis. visiting her parents Dr. and Mrs. Ambrose. Amanda Strawn. pianist. was hired at a supper club there. and so her hubby Ruffle is pulling up'xt'akrs and joining his Mrs. They will re- main until the year's contract expires. Pop-calling on friends in the middle of the week was what John and Martha Sweet decided to do last week. The Sweets are awaiting their lint visit from the aiork in November . . . Mrs. Booker Hill and daughter have arrived in Pasadena from Ton- nesseo in join Hill who came here about three months ago. Accompanied by his two sons. (‘hzrios and GeOrge and 4-year- nld daughter Kathy. Attorney (‘hnriM R. Johnson motored to the Asiiomar to attend the NAACP Youth Conference work- shop—leaving Billy and mothrr. Rosalie. free to enjoy dinncr and movie at the nearest drivc-in. ”Everyone is urged to attend' the Sept. 26 general meeting of NAACP' wh'ore, Thomas w:— Nel- son. president. assisted bv Pres Griffin. youth director. will pre-- ' sent a program especially for the youth 'of the community. Herbert L. \Vr‘izhi. National Youth Secretary of NAACP. will be speaker of the ex-enin:.'The meeting will begin at R p.rn. at the Metropolitan Baptist church. Ciaremont and Menu-me streets. On Sept. 5. Jennifer Lucile King. the heir in the James King household arrived weigh- ing 7 lbs.. 1 02. Congratulations. James King is a student at Cali- fornia Institute of Technology. A Los Angeles daily carried a feature item about Marion Downs. Lorna Alia school marm' who attended Columbia Univer- sity this summer and published Rev. Marvin T. Robinson. pas- -ior. On Oct. 13. a special Ushers Day program baa been scheduled with tribute being paid to ushers from all over the city. Oct. 20. Mrs. M. L:'budd will serve as general chairman of the Wom- en's Day service. Mrs. Adella Lewis chairs the program com- mittee and has obtained Mrs. H. Haynes of San Francisco as speaker for the morning service. Scott Bibba. 'as general chair- man of Men's day at l-‘BC. will be competing with the women for points in the areas-of pro- gram and finance as he leads the men of the church. Assist- ing Bihhs is Dr. Jeremiah Moore. program chairman. Rev. S. M. lockridge of San Diego will bring the morning message. Fred Sandford is beginning to learn that it doesn‘t pay. to play William "Bill" Brown and Rob- ert “Mutt" “’hite. golf for steak dinners. because he la buying again. with the help of Harold Batiste of Los Angeles. The William Brown household Ls elated to have son Jerry home on Air Force leave. Jerry is sta- tioned in Dover. Del.. and will leave Sept. 27. YMCA Offers Dance Courses At Scafiergood Registration has begun at the Pasadena YMCA Annex. the Scattergmd. 851 N. Fair Oaks avenue. for all interested in studying the dance. All types of dancing will be offered including Afro-Cuban. Cha Cha Cha and ballet-toe. by Mrs. Barbara Kei- ly Davis. who is beginning her second year as instructor at the Scattergood. All age groups are expected with special interest centering on pro-school and teen age groups. Last year the term re- gistration showed Mrs. Davis had 75 participants most of whom were in the 10-16 age group. For additional information about the classes available at the YMCA, call SY. 3-3131 or ' RY. 8-5794. It’s wonderful t. 0 way Chewing-Gum .. Laxative acts chiefly to REMOVE WIN? [[9] GOOD FOOD Here's a secret. million have discovered about rm-a-aunr. the wonderfully duel-ant chevinrgum luau". amt-hum is ailerons beam you chew it. We miter-at. too. beau» it removes mostly waste—not good toad! illfl-A-HIN? does not work in the much. than food. in being digested. That's why it does not take any a lot or the good tood you need {or energy. Doetoraknawtnatm-a-amrrvorn chiefly in the lower bowel...ren~vea neatly waste. not good food! And it's non-inflating. too. _ so to (eel like a mutton. chew 4o- liuioua nan-bum. ll tablets. 35¢- alao man and economy aha. urn- ._ _ mzmam. 7/7/7 i i f you CAN LIVE; . ..because of e; A surprising numbed joyed today simply a; Magic of Electricity i i and on the job to gig Electricity can cook \g' sweep your rugs. poi family acwing. it gié movies. home power i In the City of Los ALE too. For example. if i service in Lot Muscle; a bill would be for Q _ other ten largest U. S i Yes. in Los Angelo El..ECTRlCM,i.Y—— a smous‘aoaostocx to o’sssokzcanon ‘ Between the lines ' GORDON a. HANCOCK for ANP » . m my TRAGEDY Our nation has come upon critical times. The current out. breaks of lawlessness ahould he the cause 6f serious concern to the patriots of this country. The open defiance . of the laws of -this land are _ “'hat Gov- ? ' emor Faubus andthreatened » throughout the South. There can be little doubt _ that the way the Little Rock situation is handled will set a pattern for the rebellious ele- Labori _ .5 1. Side .- By WILLIAM L~POLLARD SAN FRANCISW—After at- tending three conventions in the last .10 days. this column . finds it diffi- . cult to atop long enough to make the d e a. d l in e . These 10 days have b e e n rich indeed ' beca u se of their educa- tion value ‘ . and the ultimate goals of these convention groups. We started out on Sept. 13 with the California State Coun~ cii of Culinary Workers. Bar- Otenders. and Hotel Service Em- ployees. This group comprises more than 123.000 members em- ployed in the. culinary industry ‘.in California. Resolutiom “are considered and adopted for pre— sentt‘tion to the California State Federation of Dbor convention that met Sept. 16. The "State Fed" was full of action and antici- pation. brought on hi th- led- in; Trades conditional AFL— CIO merger resoluflon and to- hotly cont‘fit‘kd race for the. vice-presidency in District 10A (Oakland). As a result of attending Merv general session and serving on a committee at each confab. this column is mentally and phy- sically “pooped." Upon adjournment of the “State Fed” comr'ntion. many of the delegates journeud to m”- comenlion 32 has dome in' ments of the South. The" is currently a show- down 'hetween Federal power and' State rights. We can under. stand why the Pmident hesi- tates to .use his power to the utmost; and we can also under- stand the danger of letting Kas- per-ism take over the destinies of the South and nation. Long since should Kasper have been lodged behind prison walls and the longer his imprisonment is postponed the greater the dan- ger. If the rubble raiser, as he calls himself. had been firmly dealt with weeks ago the na- tion's embarrassment would have been averted. But Kasper has been at large too long and it is to be feared when he comes at last to the end of his rope. other Kasper: will arise. The situation is not only diss graceful but dangerous. Too long the country has tolerated those who openly defy the laws of the. land. With a senator of the United State: calling for “mas- sive resistance" to the mandate-s of the Supreme Court and with the Southernpress too largely committed to open rebellion. the time has come that_aomelw'iy must handle the situation with a firm hand if we want law and order to he maintained in the Southern states. ' To use aermauticai language. what Faubus’ did at Little Rock was a “trial balloon" and if he gets away with it. other South- ern_ governors am ready to give it a try. . ' There it this much encourage. ment to he gained from the crit- if‘al situation: there has been little or no bloodshed. This in iicalf shows that much of the hi: \‘hqk‘ of "massive resistance" it superficial. There hate been rhanees for the shedding of blood. but. thank God, to data there ha: been none. , This further shows that the “out?! is not a total loss to rizhteousness and justice and hrntherhood There )5 an ele- ment in the South that wants to no justice prevail. hilt Kas- Nr has had too full away and the thing is threatening to get out of hand. The course of the South is not all race prejudice. as had as it is: the real curse of the hour is Kasperiam. Back to the main thesis. the great tragedy is not forcibly hindering Negroes from enter- ing the public schools. It can sists not in Negno pupils being spit upon, as disgraceful as this may be. nor does it consist in the bitter-neon and hatred which have been unleashed under the aegis of Kasperism: the great danger and ‘tragedy resides in the fact that democracy is being lynched in the eyes of the world. We have lost and are losing face as a world leader. The aeg- regationists who are operating with suchmeckleu abandon in the rebellious South are giving comfort to our enemies. the . communists. The oommunistsneed not send the mighty missile to conquer this country: all they have to do is to sit tight and let the segregationiais under the aegis of Kaaperism operate a little while longer. When the segrega- tionista have finished their dan- gerous and devastating work our nation Will become an easy prey -—-a thrmght that is sickening. What does it profit the segre- gationista to auceeed in holding the Negro down if the nation is to become a prey to the com- munists. This writer has on many occasions said that this nation cannot hold the Negro down with one hand and hold back communism with the other. llolding back communism is a two-handed tuk.’ And so we see before the eyes daily the undo- ing of the great ideal of demo- cracy. - At the close of World War I the slogan that swept around the world was "make the world ~ safe' for democracy." We hear nothi..g of this these days. Unn happily because of the nation's Kasperism our great country is moral? on the defensive much to our chagrin. The surging crowds ringing our southern schools that Wnttld integrate are communtam'a first line of offense and therein lies the greater tragedy. CAN’T RUN AWAY FROM iT The Amazing Courage of Southern Negroes Shown In Current Crisis (special to tha Lu Aaxolea Sentinel) A few weeks ago in Birthing- ham, one of the nation's most notorious strongholds or segre- . gstionism. a courageous Ne~ gro minister futilely attempted to enroll several Negro stu- dents in the all-white Phillips High school. As he approached the school, vicious, Negro-hating hoodlums attacked him. his wife, and the students. The beatings caused various injuries. and two weeks later the minister-had not yet fully recovered. Earlier. while seeking other civil rights gains, his home had been bomb- ed. But when the 35-year-old ' Rev. F. L Shuttlesworth was asked if he planned to leave Birming and move north because of the ill-treatment he had suffered. he said: "You can't win a fight by running away from it. I'm staying." His words his courage were typical of the “new Negro" in the South today. For increas- ingly, they are learning that the civil rights battle carmot be won through migration. . Dramatically. in the past few years, southern Negroes have moved into the forefront of civil rights fighters and leaders. Still minus many ad- vantages enjoyed. and boasted about by northern Negroes. they have set an example for colored people everywhere who wish to escape the yoke of op- pression. «it it it MUCH MALIGNED in the past, often considered as “poor country cousins" by northern city f olk. southern Negroes suddenly have emerged as the moat courageous segment of the race in this country. The proof of that is found in this fact: in dozens of Dixie areas, where race~hate flames with tradition, hundreds of Negro parents. students and leaders, have actually placed their lives on the .line of bat- tle for their deserved rights as citizens of the United States of America. Not only can one read cour~ age into their words and their deeds one also can read it on their faces, in the bold steps of the young who walk to pre- viously all-white schools while thugs threaten them, beat them. spit on them: in the atmosphere of Nashville, Little Rock, Birmingham, Montgom-. cry. and Tallahassee. FullJntegrathn of southern schools remains a long way off. Yet not one district could have been integrated had not Negro parents, leaders. and students possessed the courage to fight in the face of longshot odds. Can anyone imagine courage greater than that of 15~year~. oldEiizabeth Eckford of Little Rock who, all alone; tried to break through the lines of Na- tional Guardsmen Gov. Orval Faubus had stationed around Central High school? This little girl stands only 5 feet, 39': inches, weighs only 113 pounds. Yet she walked in- to the teeth of the race-haters, faced the armed Guardsmen and repeatedly tried to find a hole through which she could crack the line. “I was not afraid when I first went up to the guard," Elizabeth recalled, "but I was afraid when that crowd started following me. A terrible feel- ing of hurt came over me. No one was with me and I felt more all alone than ever be fore." But she didn't give up. That is courage personified. No less courageous were the leaders of the Montgomery bus boycott. the parents who eith- er enrolled, or tried to enroll Negro, students in previously- white schools from Virginia to Texas. students themselves who suffered untold indignities in pursuit of an ideal and the equal education they are en- titled to as full-fledged Ameri- can citizens. Even diehard Dixlecrats are beginning to see that no law- less force, no rabblerousers like John Kasper. no publicity- c r a z y. politically - ambitious man like Governor Faubus can. 'win a final victory over peo- ple who won’t be beaten. Admittedly southern Negroes possess man faults, but lack of guts is no ‘one of them. i 1k it IN THIS desegregation of education fight, southern Ne- groes have set yet another ex- ample. If you have seen the pictures out of Little Rock, Nashville, Sturgis and Louisville, Ky., Baltimore, Ozark Ark., and other cities and towns this has been inescapable. Every Negro child pictured has been neatly dressed, well- scrubbed and manicured. Their parents, many of them poor people. have shelled out of their meagere earnings to make sure their children put their best foot forward. And. as these parents, many of whom probably don't under- stand the basis of the civil rights battle. have led their children to school by hand. wonderful pride has shone in their faces. 'I‘helr steps have been firm. determined: they have held their chins up. kept their shoulders squared, even in the face of insults. By his own actions, Gover- nor Faubus has detained the courage of Little Rock Ne- groes but he has gained no stature because of it. The irony of it all is that Governor Fau- bus should have been the first to understand the needs and wants of these Negroes, for he ..is,. himself. a productof an ,underprivlleged area and, in ‘ spite of an acquiredveneer of sophistication he still retains leadership has many characteristics of the backwoodsman. . In Nashville, on the other hand, law-abiding white_ citi-_ zens, many of whom failed to “ agree with’the integration edicts, but who preferred to maintain their self respect, quickly blasted through the at- tacks of race-haters and hood- lums. The entire city was angered and shamed when the Battle Cotton school was bombed. City officials from mayor to police chief to school board heads, acted quickly. Arrests were made. The daily Nash- ville Banner suggested that Kasper and his ilk should be run out of town. The rebellion against the laws of the land was quickly contained and rendered inef- fective. Thus in contrast to Little Rock, a great victory was won at Nashville by BOTH coura- geous Negroes and whites. a)! 'K s)! WHAT DOES all this argue for the future? It seems here that this argu- es well for the southern Ne- gro. No longer is he a spineless Uncle Tom, satisfied to go along with the Jim Crow pro- gram. He has been kicked and beaten and insulted so often that he knows the big grin and the soft voice and the everlasting “Yes, sir" brings nothing but grief. Suddenly, the mantle of been tossed back to the Negroes of the South, and they have grabbed it eagerly. By their courage, they have med tha‘ti isaperfeetwt. i. If the rest of the country; the‘irridi‘d‘ a better way of life for all of us Americans is inevitable. New Activities For Rangers as Schools Open More than 9,000 boys, girls and volunteer adult leaders an- swered the tribal drums herald~ ing the opening of Woodcraft Rangers activities for the new school year. it was announced by Jack Russell, assistant execu- tive director in charge of field services for this youth serving agency of the Community Chest. The youngsters. members of more than 300 Ranger tribes in the'Los Angeles ma, have re- turned to their weekly tribal meetings after the summer re- cess. During the past summer. the three Woodcraft Rangers camps operated at maximum ca- pacitY- The nine week camping sea- son saw 2,320 youngsters at- tending Woodcraft Rangers camps for a total of 25,461 "camper-days." Red as BIoOd By HAZEL L LAMARRE The vapor rose, ominous, stifling; rose in thick dark clouds to smother me. I put out my hand to push it back and it had turned t6 liquid red as blood. Red as blood it was and it flowed. It flowed in the streets ofJWashlngton, splashed on the statues of patriots and the ...
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