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ch7_15 - crew awn arm THE‘ WORLD‘S GREATEST NEWSPAPER...

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Unformatted text preview: crew awn arm. THE‘ WORLD‘S GREATEST NEWSPAPER Focsnnn .131: in. 1347 Wed" Sept. 4, 1957 H" Part 1—- Page 24 .THE ISSUE IN ARKANSAS Gov. Orval Faubus of Arkansas has ordered out the national guard to keep a handful of Negro children from Cen- tral High school in Little Rock. Only last Friday, United States Judge Ronald Davies issued an injunction for- bidding anyone to interfere with Negro children going to the school. Now Gov., Faubus has defied the injunction. He says he is fearful that lives and property in Little Rock will be endangered. He alleges that the sales of knives and guns to Negroes and whites had increased , alarmingly in recent weeks. What the governor is trying 16 do is plain enough. The Supreme court has said that racial segregation in the schools violates the clause of the 14th amendment providing for equal protec- tion of the laws to all citizens. regard-. less of race. Against this, Mr. Faubus is now raising the point that the state gov- ernments have the inherent right under the Constitution to safeguard lives and iFaselst Refugee committee to turn over .records to the house un-American activi- ties committee. [The plagiarism involved in his book about John P. Altgeld was settled by an out Harry Barnard, from whose earlier {book Fast helped himself freely] l l iron curtain and thoroly divests himself of his old loyalties, he may stay out of ' jail from here on. At least, he is n03 longer wearing a thin disguise that fooled'hardly anybody. THE AMBASSADOR TO MONGOLIA The climate in Ulan Bator is not, [such as to give it a wide reputation as a resort city. Ulan Bator, better known as Urga, is the capital of the Mongolian People’s Republic, earliest of the Rus- sian satellites. it is in the midst of the desert steppes from which the Mongol Horde rode seven centuries ago to over- whelm Europe as far as Hungary, and the summer heat is fully matched by‘ the winter cold. of court payment to“ If Fast stays on the right side of the, -stimulated by uncertainty and argument” A LINE .0’ TYPE OR TWO How to the Line. let the quip: fall where they may. 89:. U S. 1 Pat. Dim-e - I t l \ SOME OTHER PEOPLE’S THOUGHTS 0N KNOWLEDGE in the fall a youngsters fancy heavily Eturns to thoughts of education, and par- ents are busy fabricating praises of' schoolwork which they would have re-' garded as treason in their own child- hood. But the lectures of grownups have, little beneficial effect; and realizing that: a child’s interest is more apt to be! we have assembled the following contro versial thoughts on the subject of knowledge: Knowledge is the wing whereby we: fly to heaven. Knowledge is the only fountain, both of the love and the principles of human liberty. ——Daniel Webster Knowledge without integrity is dan- gerous and dreadful. -—Samuel Johnson * * Neither is the city noted for its so-, icial amenities. It has a population of.: :70,000, who are engaged in saddle mak-l ing, brewing, and other callings to serve; the million-odd modern Mongols, most} got whom follow their herds thru the: All I know is that I know nothing. i —Socrates We don‘t know a millionth of one per cent about anything. —Thomas A. Edison My name it is Benjamin Jowitt, I l —Shakespeare g . h,- T.-R. us or]: '1 HOW 'Ill KEE] To the limit of tion: pertaining to lieu of disease will l Personal replies act when return stamp is included. Telephc not accepted. Dr. will not make diam: scribe for individual ALL SHOOK [O 1957: By The Chit HE GARDEN Tbefore the Ea fears or tensi then, man has hadt stress and strain a: he fro but to obtain a achievement. But sion causes conflict not be solved, adjus needed. —0— Some individual: property. l'm Master of Balliol College; ,desert as did their more warlike ances-E {perpetual state of a The presumed conflict of constitu- tional rights may seem plausible until you start thinking about it. True, it is the duty of the governor to keep the peace but there is no need to do it by defying the courts of the United States. Why didn’t Mr. Faubus stop the sale of knives and guns if he thought it was imperilingethe peace? And why, if he had reason to fear violence at the school, didn’t he instruct his national guard officers to protect the Negroes whose right to go to the school has been established beyond any question? One other point deserves to be empha- sizedgln the session of Congress just ended, the southern members insisted that a law adopted soon after the end of the Civil war be repealed. This law authorized the use of the United States army to enforce injunctions of the fed- eral courts. The law was enacted to make.certain that Negroes would not be deprived of their newly won rights. So . far as we know, recourse was never had to this statute, and certainly it has not been invoked within living memory. Nevertheless, the southern members‘ of Congress insisted that it be repealed and it was repealed. ’l‘hcy cried that it was unthinkable that military force should be 'used to enforce an order of court. Well, maybe so: but. if so, it should be an even greater offense to use military force to defy an order of court. We await with interest the cries from southern senators expressing their alarm Etors. ‘ Ulan Bator has a new resident. V. M. Molotov, the former premie'r and for- eign minister whose “Nyet” used to “shake the chancelleries of Europe, has been designated soviet ambassador to Ithe Mongolian People‘s Republic. His I predecessor has been instructed to stay :with instructions to see that Mr. Molo- tov doesn’t put thru any long distance calls or dispatch any carrier pigeons to his companion in disgrace, former Pre. mier Malenkov. who is now running an the Red empire. 'heavy. Mr. Molotov will have time for long walks, if he can keep the sand out of his eyes, and sober reflection. It is 'quite possible that he may find the cli- mate bearable. It is not nearly as damp as the cellars of the Lubianka prison, and surely no colder than the grave. : DIPLOMACY BY THREAT The original schedule given our navy‘s ;l\leditcrranean fleet called for dropping .anchor off the French Riviera a fewdays ago an i stead. the two carriers and other power- ful clcments of the 6th fleet have been ordered to remain at sea, ready to pounce. Dispatches from Washington made it v 1 l on the job in a lower post, probably! :electric light plant in Kazahkstan, an: {other of the to-hcll-and-gone sectors of. The duties of the embassy are not. d staying there for some time. ln-- lWhatever is knowledge, I know it. t gdiscomfort; they And what I don't know isn‘t knowl-ECFiSiS after another. edge, Inot as bad off as tl __Epigram at Oxford university {éiaffafiizecffigi’pgi * t , minor. There are four sorts of men: These men and 'He who knows not and knows not helnever acquired the iknows not: he is a {ooh—shun him. lequipment in chi He who knows not and knows heihelp them overcome knows not: he is simple—teach him. .lday ups and down: He who knows and knows not hEIhood. They need tc knows: he is asleep—-—wake him. Ihabits and attitudes He who knows and knows he knows:l{or emotional securi he is wise~—follow him. work load seems I -—Arabian proverb quoted by ,they ought to plan Lady Burton - most urgent tasks f Men are called fools in one age for notfis 1°“ 0"" can 1 {knowing what they were called fools for‘later’ l ..._ laverring in the age before. M . . . . am )erson. e —11cnry Ward Beecher lmuch of Ithemsclve: There is nothing so stupid as an edu-gand fume when thei cated man, if you get off the thing that‘imenls fall below he was educated in. ——Will Rogers These people shou? Soap and education are not as suddenigfifit tgey $3522: 01‘; as a massacre, but they are more deadly i . . in th , _, . . » .production. ' 9 long TUE—f—‘Marh leazn I Help is needed , , . f ‘ . ,emotional 11 sets 51 “”3 ”1-451? iwhelming. Cponfide {The starry beasts of night creep off to}, c a d c d friend, i i . hide. {clergyman or physic As day. the hunter, stands on heaven‘s rimflnlng away from ”011 good policy but occa :is the thing to do. '1 fival provides an oppo lregain balance and :problem in its true 1 IA bright-limbed archer who surveys with pride EThe ranges taken over now by him. lllis shaft has laid the Bull and Lion low; lCapella and her kids spill golden blood :ln some celestial thicket. and his bow over Gov. Faubus’ TUIMCSS use Of theEclear that the reason for the change ot§1l35.d0“‘n°d the Bears “‘ht‘x‘e Shininxlyl military. but we are not holding ourlptans was not the presence in the Medi—l breath until we hear them. iterranean of a couple of Russian war- ,-t.:_- \1- -..-L r ______ 4L. fi‘v. n they stood. ESince first pursued. the hunt has varied ‘ h i 1 —-The last time state troops ’of Arkansas did yesterday, - gation decisions. _in 1809. and others brought action in _ him a judgment. , )I Troop Stand Recalls fNEGRU GIRL l5. State-U. s. ‘Battle’l‘ATlAGKEDWITH. I RUGK_8_,_§_TIGKSJ ‘ Nashvrlle, Tenn. Sept. 4 til’llture promptly passed an inter- position resolution declaring the federal courts had no jur- ‘isdiction in the case and that] the judgment “ ought not to be supported or obeyed." Peters then refused to issue , . N. Carolina School an order to enforce his Judg- menti and Olmstead broughtha Charlotte. N. C.. Sept. 4 W— man amus action against 1 e shm'"m’. n'g-Jgesticulating white Judge in the famous case of {$352.5 ' spectators hurled U. S. vs. Peters. . roél‘? sticks and spat 3‘ In that case Chief Justi ‘ today 3fler her Marshall gave the idea of in-fogfi; terposition short shrift andl'igtb ordered Peters to enforce his: judgment. Then came the — . . . , - A Jeering crowd had fol- showdown. Peters issued an . order to United States Mar- lowed the girl, 13°”th Ger- shal John Smith to ct the aldine Counts. 15..after she money from the exeeftors of entered Harding High school the estate of Rittenhouse who was then dead. Troops Surround House When the marshal arrived at the Rittenhouse home Gov. Simon Snyder already had surrounded it with state mill-{crowd behind her she was tia troops under the commandzstruck with a stick. Police ar- of Bright. . lrcstcd a boy and a girl. Thercupon S m i t h sum- - moncd a posse of 2.000 Penn- Other PUP”! Jecred sylvania citizens. armed them In other public schools in and appointed officers. The Charlotte. IVorth Carolina's details of the " battle of Rit- largest city. two othelj yoimg tenhouse square " are not too Negroes entered their fiX’St clear in the books, but app”. day wrth_ white classmates ently no shooting occurred. amid T0131!” calm. “ it sounds like they had They. too, received hoot: troops on one side of the and catcalls, but there were street and the posse on the no 131?? 01'0st and no dem‘ other," Sanders said. “This onstrations. The mother of - t 1 e 1 'ecks, . one Negro student decided 3:331‘121’13'91‘58‘, ra “ ap not to send her daughter to The stalemate was brokenla Wh'te school ‘9‘!”- when Gov. Snyder asked Presi- \ The .Counts girl was calm dent James Madison to inter- and W‘scd- , _ vene. Madison. who had had “1. expected this kmd °{ ’9'! a large part in framing the ception."she said"‘b"§1h_°pel cles of Confederation. The re- COMUWHWv refused 10- 1523”“ change m a “90k or versal was not rcco nized b‘v Snyder then paid over the ' _ the Pennsylvania chrts andlmoney “to avoid further emu T“° Teen-tigers Seized . the case hung fire for a qunrfibarrassmcnt" to flittcnhouse'si City police. who had officers; to: of a century. icxccutrix. ;at all the schools with Negro In 1803. Gideon Olmstcadi Gen. Bright and eight of his Students enrolled. charredi subordinates were convicted 11151031 WOQG Flowers. 18.. at1 the still new federal circuitiand sentenced to fines and l-lardmg High student. with court in. Philadelphia. andiprison terms. The legal issue Simple “Sim“ "1 the throwing. Judge Richard Peters granted=having been settled, however, 0f the $116}: which hit the President Madison pardoned Counts girl. _ _ The Pennsylvania legisia-‘them almost immediately. ‘. Patrrcra Elizabeth Smllh. 15" _._.—_.-——--—-- :wasd clitaigged lwithdldisort'z'c'rly; e . con uc or a ege y spi mg Four Seized in Kentucky ion Row were used, in a showdown ef- fort to balk a federal court order, as Gov. Orval Faubus the state militia commander- wound 'up in jail. i it is doubtful that Pennsyl-l vania's Gen. Michael-Bright actually spent much time be- hind bars, but he was in- dicted, tried, convicted and. sentenced after the “battle of i Rittenhouse square " in 1809.! Details of the story were dug' out of the old laws books by rof. Paul H. Sanders of the Vanderbilt university law school. who is director of the Race Relations Law Reporter. Resulted from Order The Race Relations Law Re- porter is a non-partisan publi- cation which collects and prints legal materials devel- oped as a result of the 1954- 55 U. S. Supreme court segre- " f"aii.iv‘nize high to yell. “Go home." outside ithe window of her ground floor homeroom. As she left. white students ran past. jostling her, and on her way homeward with the The case began with a pri- vateer's capture of a British sloop in 1778 and wound upI with Pennsylvania state mili- tiamen staring across a PM!- adelphia square at 2.000 armed deputy U. S. marshals Decided in Courts Pennsylvania courts orig- inally decided the contest for the prize money realized from sale of the British sloop Ac- tive. The money was paid over to Pennsylvania”: state treasurer, a man named Rit- tenhouse, as stakeholder. The state decision was re- versed by the committee on appeals of‘ the Continental Congress under the old Arti- on the Negro girl. Officers said another. whom they de- scribed as an apparent insti- gator of the demonstration. was taken to headquarters and‘ Sturgis Kv Sept 4 (3.1 ’“gh‘mw/ x: quedstioned. No charge was: r -' . \ "V . 0‘ ma e. hentucky state police today! ’{alfijfiwmls W“ /» Gustavus Allen Roberts 16‘ arrested a woman and a 19°“? I r? J xsmucfl‘l A _, ' ‘acc m an'ed b h's father, on: agcr outside integrated Slur-i Yang: _(/V1‘R’GEN:A :t odg ntrall-l’i hischoolwith-i gis High school. Inside the; r—jgm. jfimi‘j'ifc" vofltcmae.“ mime“ A few school, 17 Negro and 259‘ TENNESSEE y’cmgmr ‘suectatogs taunted him outside white students mingled with-: rs -m-—.——(;—-,/*‘\ 5 p . . _ , ' “i - " we :the building but there “as. out incident. 1 Two white juvenile boys]... also were arrested by state: police who claimed the youths‘ 55° “#55 “NA inothing unusual in his recep- ——“‘— ”“""ition from white students and; when crowds prevented Negroltcachers. : . ‘. “ students from enrolling. This} His sister, Girvaud Lillie: 3‘ are; seen. ””ng 0b'lyear no Negroes attempted toilloberts. 12. also received a! Jects. Hearing was set 1:‘JXXattend the Clay clcmentaryifcw jeers when she entered‘ tomorrow 93“”? C 0 u n ‘ 3“school. iPiedmont Junior High school; Judge Tom " Richards. The; A crowd of about 100 gathv; The mother of Dolores Max-i youths were released m cus‘Ecred before the school opcncdiinc lluntlcy. 12. who was to» “XI-Y °£ ”1°” parents. Chargesitoday but the Negro studentsistart classes today at previous against‘them were “MW-'1' ‘entered without .troublc.ély all-while Alexander Graham Tcnsmn ‘continucd‘to mount! After the students had en-iJuniorlligh school.telephoned, l“ ““5 mmmg‘.‘?’¥"‘“£ °°"."ltered the building. :1 While‘school officials that she was‘ munity and 3 elm-291.15 CWM‘xéwoman was arrested follow-Weeping the child home tori opposmg desegregation °f the: ing an argument Willi 1W0 NC-ithe day. Officials said the im- school scheduled a mass meet-i gro women. in; tonight. l State Police Capt. Stewartiwould start classes in the State troopers have been pa-iMiiler identified her as Mrs.lschool later this week. trolinz the school area sinceiMadge Lucas. She was; yesterday when students regis' charged with using abusive-j tcrcd. They are under orders language to incite riot. l.atcr.; to arrest anyone causing a dis-. the teenager was seized. ' turbancc. .‘lrs. Lucas and the teen-1 Kentucky national guard'ager were released by City! u i .‘E‘I ist Student of Race in :‘ 38' a student in a . this morning. some staying ' l Integration in Nortlt_CErolina [Proposes Mu) tc order: after she departed from Mayor Daley Hits Back" in Urban League Attack Mayor Daley took issue yes- terday with Edwin C. Berry. executive director of the Chi- cago Urban league. who criti-i cized Chicago's progress in race relations Tuesday at the annual conference of the Na- tional Urban league in Detroit. Berry described Chicago as the most segregated large city in the nation, with race rela- tions at the most primitive, level. He said that in Chicago’ “a Negro dare not step out- side the environs of his race." He also asserted that solution of Chicago race problems was; being delayed by “a conpir- acy of silence among Chicago‘s mass media." Angrily Denies Charges " We appreciate the work of Mr. Berry and his organiza- (Sfory in churning calm In Charlotte, N. C., Dorothy Counts sits in her first class in white high school. Two teenagers were arrested during dis- BY RICHARD [Glenn 'f'rlbne hen laurel Detroit, Sept. 4—Legisla- tion requiring the sale and .rental of all housing on a - racially nondiscriminatory -. basis was urged today by James H. Scheuer. executive board chairman of City and Suburban Homes company. Neerork City, at a luncheon of the National Urban league‘s annual conference here. ‘ Such laws, together with an expanded federal housing pro- gram for all income groups lshould. help to reduce the im- ‘ pact upon minorities of urban renewal programs, Scheuer said. l ~ Scheuer said moves towardi ' ,open occupancy laws should ~ begin with new housing built . with government assistance land, eventually, should in- clude property constructed for sale or rental as well as privately constructed homes. i Urges Urban Affairs Dept. As additional aids he sug-. gested a federal department' {of urban affairs'and integra- A school. {Associated rm. “'lrrr-holol h i g h w a y construction pro- grams. Scheuer argued against the stand taken by some to defer further slum clearance and highway improvements until the housing supply for minori- ties catches up with demand. Minorities can be integrated into American life as an inci- angrily. "But I don't believe| Chicago is as bad as some peo- ple say it is. “We are making progress in race relations, but we are not perfect. We are not a city [of all sin. We are human be- Bias in All H ( PHILBRICI “ that tradi skilled labo The old ski dustry are our younger ing trained. Sees “V The natiOi ing populat faster rise i ards mean t 10 or 20 ; States will 1 find enougl work, Robei president i: sonnel of the tion, said. By deter fields jobs : by getting Negroes can a satisfactor panding eco. One of th of all fieli maintenanct been estima the country at l e 3 st 1 ltion of slum rebuilding andimechanics b if. B. Lav av.. head 0 firm of H. 'cago, was 0 reelected to board of Louis E. chief of. the publications, league vice ings. t Lands Press, Police “Mr. Berry came here re- cently from Seattle. and he‘siizdsazi‘g trying to do a good job. On the: sidcntial construction, i Scheuer pointed to Stuyve- isant town development in New :York City and Levittown on iLong island, N. Y.. as ex- ;amples of communities where :Negroes have obtained good doing. in ”“5 lick?" . ihomcs without creating .inter- Police Commrssroncr O Con-graciai friction. i .nor commented: "i don‘t: iknow Mr. Berry. But the police} Cites Better Jobs lhave maintained law and order More and better jobs. as l §other hand. I'd like to compli- ment the police department. ithc press. radio and TV. and the human relations Commis- [sion for the good job they are dental byproduct of the im-i mense increase in population FEDERAL COURT]; tion in Chicago." Daley Saidiand will continue to do so.&q...
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