harlem renaissance 2008

harlem renaissance 2008 - The Great Migration, 1916-1919 In...

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The Great Migration, 1916-1919 In 1910, three out of every four black Americans lived on farms, and nine out of ten lived in the South. World War I changed that profile. Hoping to escape tenant farming, sharecropping, and peonage, 1.5 million Southern blacks moved to cities. During the 1910s and 1920s, Chicago's black population grew by 148 percent; Cleveland's by 307 percent; Detroit's by 611 percent.
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Leaving
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The 1910s: Back to Africa or Follow the North Star? "We have a beautiful history, and we shall create another one in the future." – Marcus Garvey The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) won important Supreme Court decisions against the grandfather clause (1915) and restrictive covenants (1917, but reversed in 1926). The NAACP also fought school segregation in Northern cities during the 1920s and lobbied hard, though unsuccessfully, for a federal anti-lynching bill. In World War I, a higher proportion of black soldiers than white soldiers had lost their lives: 14.4 percent black compared to 6.3 percent white. Ten African American soldiers were among the 70 blacks lynched in 1919. Twenty-five anti-black riots took place that year.
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Power in the Darkness One is astonished in the study of history at the recurrence of the idea that evil must be forgotten, distorted, skimmed over. We must not remember that Daniel Webster got drunk but only that he was a splendid constitutional lawyer. We must forget that George Washington was a slave owner . . . and simply remember the things we regard as creditable and inspiring. The difficulty, of course, with this philosophy is that history loses its value as an incentive and example; it paints perfect man and noble nations, but it does not tell the truth. WEB Dubois
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Destinations
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Black Family Arriving in Chicago
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"Bronzeville
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Southside Chicago Tenements
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The Migrant Statue in Chicago
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The Great Migration in the Artist's Eye
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Jacob Lawrence The Migration of the Negro
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    Ida B. Wells and Justice for Ida B. Wells and Justice for African Americans and Women African Americans and Women Journalist Anti-Imperialist Pro-Imperialist Women's Suffrage
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Well's home in Chicago
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Harlem Renaissance, 1924-? Cultural/Political Explosion in the Black Community Authors: Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, WEB Dubois Artists: Mailou Jones, Jacob Lawrence, Palmer Hayden Musicians: Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Cab Calloway and More
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Harlem in the 1920s: Transforming African American Identity WEB Dubois Alain Locke Stephanie St. Claire, “Queenie”
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Cultures of Resistance Cultural Forms and Practices which Evolve as a Reaction to Real or Perceived Oppression Art, Music, Literature and Poetry as Expressions of Defiance or Preservation of a Culture under Siege - Anger, Sorrow, Hope, Liberation are Dominant Themes Can Include Rituals, Outlawed Customs and/or Religion Often Evolve Because Physical Resistance or Flight is
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This note was uploaded on 03/18/2010 for the course HIST 242 taught by Professor Carlson during the Spring '10 term at Canada College.

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harlem renaissance 2008 - The Great Migration, 1916-1919 In...

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