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Running head: BOUNCING BALL EXPERIMENT1Bouncing ball experimentStudent’s NameInstitution affiliationCourseDate
BOUNCING BALL EXPERIMENT2IntroductionWith regard to the essential physical laws of the universe, our instinct frequently plays some tricks on us. For instance, we may feel that a bowling ball will fall faster than a marble, yetgravity's hang on the lighter marble is similarly as solid as its hang on the heavier bowling ball, and the two travel to the ground at the very same speed (Kajiyama, 2019). Over and over, what we think ought to happen to be proven wrong by what all things considered occurs. This is the reason we have to test the entirety of our suspicions about the universe thoroughly.In the accompanying report, we thoroughly test the presumption that a ball dropped from a higher height will bounce a larger number of times than a ball dropped from a lower height. Weaccept this presumption since our instinct reveals to us that the higher a ball is before it is dropped, the more speed it will get as it is falling (Kajiyama, 2019). A ball hitting the ground with more prominent speed should bounce higher than a ball striking the ground with less speed; hence, a ball dropped from a greater height will skip higher than a ball dropped from a lesser height.At the point when a ball is bouncing high into the air, it will keep on bouncing for some time. On the other hand, a low‐bouncing ball will immediately come up short on room between the heights of each bounce and the ground, and, thusly, the balls will stop bouncing altogether. Along these lines, it just makes sense well that a ball will bounce more frequently when it is discharged from a more prominent height. To prove this, we need to demonstrate our guess aboutthe material science behind bouncing balls; we can't depend on our instinct. We have to utilize a well‐ planned trial to explore the connection between the height of a falling ball's release point and how often the ball bounces before stopping.
BOUNCING BALL EXPERIMENT3The experiment will investigate the bounce efficiency of a tennis ball when dropped fromdifferent heights. After it has been dropped, the tennis ball bounces back somewhat according to its unique drop height. At the drop height, the tennis ball has gravitational potential energy, which is then changed into kinetic energy as it tumbles to the ground (Kajiyama, 2019). Upon impact with the ground, this energy is changed into elastic potential energy when the ball again quashes, which is then changed into motor vitality once more, sending the tennis ball once again into the airAppendix A:Energy flow chart 1: tennis ballResearch question (RQ)

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