jijoh data

jijoh data - while gathering this data. This data might...

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NAME: AZIZAH AHMAD PROJECT PHASE II SAMPLING METHODS AND POTENTIAL BIASES The data I provided is in a numerical data and I used the observational method for this data. I observed the salary for the top 60 most popular jobs and make a conclusion about the salary for all of these jobs. My data of salary for top 60 most popular jobs in United States used stratified random as a method of sampling. The 60 jobs are taken from six different majors which are Biology majors, Mechanical Engineering majors, Business Management majors, Economic majors, Computer Science majors and Psychology majors. The top 10 most popular jobs are taken from each of the division of the six majors and at the end will have a total of 60 jobs. Another method is simple random sampling as every job in the six majors has an equal chance of being selected. Ten jobs from each major are randomly selected. Besides that, convenience sampling might have occurred
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Unformatted text preview: while gathering this data. This data might only rely on individuals who volunteer to be a part of the sample by responding this survey. Potential bias that might occur in this data is selection bias. This is because the salaries of the most popular jobs are only ranked by popularity among graduate students. Only salary from graduated students are taken and measured in this data and thus, a relevant portion of other populations is left out such as people in the public. Another potential bias is non-response bias. While gathering information about the salary, there might be a possibility that some portions of the population do not respond when being asked. As with selection bias, non-response bias can distort this result if those who respond differ in some important ways....
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This note was uploaded on 03/18/2010 for the course COS 101121501 taught by Professor Langner during the Fall '08 term at RIT.

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