lecture 14 - chem

lecture 14 - chem - General & Analytical Chemistry II...

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1011-216 Winter 2008/2009 Lecture 14
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Concentration vs. Time Rate = k[N 2 O 5 ] m Is often referred to as the differential rate law. If we sum the rate over successive time intervals we get [N 2 O 5 ] vs. t For a 1 st -order reaction the integrated rate law l n[N 2 O 5 ] = l n[N 2 O 5 ] o -kt l n(.1) = -2.3 [N 2 O 5 ] o = 0.1 mol/L
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Zero-Order Reactions For A products - [A]/ t=±k For zero-order reactions the rate is constant. Zero-order reactions are observed for many surface reactions. Integrated Rate Law [A] = [A] o –kt Unit of k mol/L.s t 1/2 = [A] o /2k
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1 st - Order Reactions For A products - [A]/ t=±k[A] A graph of rate vs. concentration will have a slope of k. Radioactive decay follows 1 st - order kinetics. Integrated rate law: l n[N 2 O 5 ] = l n[N 2 O 5 ] o –kt Units of k (1/s) = s -1 t 1/2 = l n(2)/k l n(.1) = -2.3 [N 2 O 5 ] o = 0.1 mol/L
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lecture 14 - chem - General & Analytical Chemistry II...

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