p121hw1solnssp10

p121hw1solnssp10 - 12.) Which of the following are...

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12.) Which of the following are permissible amounts of charge for an object to have? Select all that are correct (and none that are incorrect) to receive credit. (You should assume the elementary charge value is exactly e=1.6·10 -19 C.) A neutral object is made out of an equal number of protons and electrons. The object becomes charged when there is an imbalance of the two. Both particles carry a charge of amount ‘e’ (elementary charge) with protons = +e and electrons = -e. We consider these indivisible a , so permissible net charges must be integer multiples of e. For the listed charge amounts, we take a ratio of them with e=1.6 · 10 -19 C and see if an integer results. If so, the charge is permissible; it can be achieved exactly by creating an imbalance of the appropriate number of electrons or protons. If the charge is negative, there must be more electrons than protons (usually, the electrons are added to the object). If the charge is positive, there must be more protons than electrons (usually, the electrons are removed from the object). (-1/2
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p121hw1solnssp10 - 12.) Which of the following are...

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