lecture16_june_30

lecture16_june_30 - Overview Properties of Visual Images...

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Overview Properties of Visual Images Visual Imagery and Memory Imagery and the Brain
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Properties of Visual Images Finke, 1989 1. Implicit encoding Images give access to information not explicitly encoded e.g., Brooks (1968) e.g., number of cabinets in your kitchen
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X No Yes Yes No Yes Yes No Yes Yes etc N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y etc Brooks (1968)
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Properties of Visual Images 2. Perceptual Equivalence Imagery activates similar systems as does perception Perky 1910: people are sometimes unable to distinguish between their own images and faint pictures actually projected on a screen Farah, 1985: Ps form an image of a capital letter, and later are presented with degraded letters; Imaging/visualization of letters beforehand leads to more accurate and faster identification of letters
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Properties of Visual Images 3. Spatial Equivalence Spatial relationships in images correspond to spatial relationships in actual physical space E.g., recall Kosslyn’s scanning studies Time needed to scan from one visual element of visual image to another corresponds to distance between physical element
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Spatial equivalence Kosslyn et al., 1978 Fictional island map with 7 objects Paths between objects range from 2-19cm Scan mental map and push button when travel between two given objects is complete RT to scan correlated with physical distance between objects on the map Kerr 1983 blind people learned maps by touch and then did mental scanning they gave same results as sighted people
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Image Scanning Kosslyn et al. 1978
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Properties of Visual Images 4. Transformational Equivalence Image transformations and physical transformations are governed by the same laws of motion Recall mental rotation works the same way as physical rotation It takes time to rotate (depends on angle of rotation) It seems continuous (i.e., there are intermediate states) The whole object is rotated and not just the parts
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Properties of Visual Images 5. Structural Equivalence As do pictures, images have a coherent structure, are well organized and can be reorganized and reinterpreted Kosslyn et al. (1983) Just as picture inspection depends on complexity, so does
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2010 for the course PSYCH 207 taught by Professor Lodson during the Spring '05 term at Waterloo.

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lecture16_june_30 - Overview Properties of Visual Images...

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