lecture4_disruptions_of_perception

lecture4_disruptions_of_perception - Outline Bottom-Up...

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Outline Bottom-Up Processes Top-Down Processes Other Views of Perception Unusual Perception
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Other Views of Perception Focuses on understanding how come to recognize objects as forms Form perception: segregation of displays into objects and background Gestalt Approaches to Perception
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The Forest Has Eyes” - Bev Doolittle
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“The Forest Has Eyes” - Bev Doolittle
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Other Views of Perception Goal is to derive Gestalt principles of perceptual organization Gestalt Approaches to Perception
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(A) the principle of proximity (B) the principle of similarity (C) and (D) the principle of good continuation (E) the principle of closure (F) the principle of common fate
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Other Views of Perception Ecological Approaches to Perception J. J. Gibson (1950): “The perception of the visual world” perception is driven exclusively by the structure of the environment (i.e., Direct Perception) “perception is a function of stimulation and stimulation is a function of the environment” (Gibson, 1959, p. 459); therefore perception is a function of the environment. “I learned that when a science does not usefully apply to practical problems there is something wrong with the theory of science”
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Information in the World Exploration Cognitive Structures (Schemata) Neisser’s (1976) perceptual cycle
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Outline Bottom-Up Processes Top-Down Processes Other Views of Perception Unusual Perception
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Unusual Perception Study of patients with acquired (or developmental) brain damage Emphasis on the preserved cognitive
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2010 for the course PSYCH 207 taught by Professor Lodson during the Spring '05 term at Waterloo.

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lecture4_disruptions_of_perception - Outline Bottom-Up...

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