HEIDEGGER_S+NAZISM+AND+THE+HYPOSTATIZATION+OF+BEING

HEIDEGGER_S+NAZISM+AND+THE+HYPOSTATIZATION+OF+BEING -...

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Abstract Following the publication of Being and Time (1927/1962), Heidegger’s conception of Being underwent a process of progressive deterioration and reification, seen first in his attempt to materialize it in the political sphere by merging it with the Nazi movement, and then, as he distanced himself from the Nazis and increasingly withdrew into isolation, in his hypostatizing Being into something of the nature of a divine force or energy. The present study is an investigation of the salient themes that pervaded Heidegger’s personal psychological world and of how these themes left their imprint on both his philosophy and his version of Nazism. It will be shown that both Heidegger’s life and work were dominated by the quest for individualized selfhood and the accompanying struggle against annihilating aloneness.
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------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ -------- HEIDEGGER’S NAZISM AND THE HYPOSTATIZATION OF BEING Robert D. Stolorow, Ph.D. George E. Atwood, Ph.D. Donna M. Orange, Ph.D., Psy.D. It has long been known that ancient ontology works with ‘Thing- concepts’ and that there is a danger of ‘reifying consciousness’…. W hy does this reifying always keep coming back to exercise its dominion? --Martin Heidegger, Being and Time I work concretely and factically out of my ‘I am,’ out of my intellectual and wholly factic origin, milieu, life-contexts, and whatever is available to me from these as a vital experience in which I live.
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--Martin Heidegger, letter to Karl Lowith, 8/19/21 We regard Heidegger’s (1927/1962) Being and Time as one of the most important philosophical works of the twentieth century, particularly in its devastating challenge to the Cartesian doctrine of the isolated mind. Indeed, in a number of publications (Stolorow, 2006, 2007a; Stolorow, Atwood, and Orange, 2002), we have sought to illuminate the relevance and value of Heidegger’s analysis of existence for a post-Cartesian, contextualist perspective in psychoanalysis. Following the publication of Being and Time , however, Heidegger’s conception of Being underwent a process of progressive deterioration and reification, seen first in his attempt to materialize it in the political sphere by merging it with the Nazi movement, and then, as he distanced himself from the Nazis and increasingly withdrew into isolation, in his hypostatizing Being into something of the nature of a divine force or energy. The present article, in which we explicate and attempt to account for this process of deterioration and reification, may be seen as part of a larger project of contextualizing post-Cartesian philosophical thought itself, of which we consider our own psychoanalytic viewpoint to be representative. In the concluding chapter of a book written by two of us (Atwood and
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HEIDEGGER_S+NAZISM+AND+THE+HYPOSTATIZATION+OF+BEING -...

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