3 - first contact 2009

3 - first contact 2009 - FirstContact:1000?1492 Others Who...

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First Contact: 1000? -1492
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Others Who Came . . . or Might Have Zheng Tse – Chinese – 1421 Polynesians – 700CE Vikings – 1000CE St. Brendan – 867CE - Irish
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Zheng Tse – Chinese – 1421 Santa Maria Chinese Treasure Ship
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Christopher Columbus
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Ferdinand and Isabella
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Columbus Discovering . . . . . . Well, He Never Really Figured Out What He Was Discovering.
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State of the art European cartography, 1507 Dude. Where’s my continent?
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Where’s China?
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Just beyond that thin strip of land up ahead.
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Portuguese Trade Routes, 1490
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Columbus and the Taino Not disputed: The Father of Modern American Slavery The beginning of a wildly profitable and ultimately failed experiment
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The Voyages of Columbus
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From America to Europe: Corn The First Key to British Colonial Survival
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The Colombian Exchange: To Europe The Tomato And . . . Becomes a staple of Mediterranean Food
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The Potato Plantation Slavery in Ireland
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Tobacco
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Other plants of the Americas:
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From Europe to America: Swine
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Horses and Cattle
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Smallpox: “There came to us a great sickness, a general plague killing vast numbers of people.”
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Christianity
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Conquest and Colonization The Beginning of the Theft of a World
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Establishing A Pattern Did European Colonists Ever Question the Moral Justifications of Their Actions in the New World?
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Bartholome de Las Casas: The First Human Rights Activist? “ . . . from 1494 to 1508, over three million people had perished from war, slavery, and the mines. Who in future generations will believe this? I myself writing it as a knowledgeable eyewitness can hardly believe it."
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Sublimus Dei, Pope Paul III May 2, 1537 We, who, though unworthy, exercise on earth the power of our Lord and seek with all our might to bring those sheep of His flock who are outside into the fold committed to our charge, consider, however, that the Indians are truly men and that they are not only capable of understanding the Catholic Faith but, according to our information, they desire exceedingly to receive it. Desiring to provide ample remedy for these evils, We
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This note was uploaded on 03/18/2010 for the course HIST 245 taught by Professor Carlson during the Spring '10 term at Canada College.

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3 - first contact 2009 - FirstContact:1000?1492 Others Who...

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