South Asia Lecture Notes

South Asia Lecture Notes - South Asia Setting the...

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South Asia Setting the Boundaries o 2 nd most populous region in the world o Subcontinent o India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Landa, and the Maldives o Regional unity : Shared history Geography of Family Planning o Family planning Approaches and acceptance differ India Pakistan Bangladesh Physical Subregions o Northern Mountains Himalayas, Karakorum o Indus – Granges – Brahmaputra Lowlands o Peninsular India Deccan Plateau Ghat Mountains o Southern Islands Sri Lanka – tropical climate Maldives
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Agricultural Regions o Subsistence crops Rice Wheat Millet – another type of grain – usually eaten by poor people o Other products Oil seeds, coconut groves, spice gardens, tea plantations o Livestock White revolution Green Revolution o 1960s o Hybrid crops to increase food production o Succeeded in increasing food production o Ecological and social failure? Large amounts of industrial fertilizer Frequent pesticide applications Affordability Affect on women o Rural to urban migration Maharashtra Suicides o Future food supply? Salinization Falling water tables Urban Geography
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Urban o 30-40% o Rapid growth Homelessness Poverty Congestion Water shortages Air pollution Sewage disposal problems S.S. – bustees British Influence on Urbanization o Selected Calcutta (Kolkata), Bombay (Mumbai) and Madras (Chenai) Regional trading centers Fortified ports o Madras fortified 1950, Bombay, 1665 o Calcutta Ganges Delta Population o Moved from Calcutta to a New Delhi Mumbai ( Bombay) o Largest South Asian City 16 million o India’s financial, industrial, and commercial center o Major port on the Arabian Sea o Contrasts in wealth and poverty o 2008 Terrorist attacks
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o Slum Dog Millionaire Delhi o Capital city o 11 million people o Old Delhi, a former Muslim capital o Wide boulevards, monuments, parks, and expansive residential areas o Began as British colonial capital o Air pollution Kolkata ( Calcutta) o 12-15 million o Typical problems o Culturally vibrant o (massive flooding) o Absorbed refugees East Pakistan o Power outages, labor unrest, breathtaking violence, demands for land redistribution in rural West Bengal. o 6,000 hand-pulled rickshaws o New embrace of capitalism and modernity o Investment, modern shopping malls and overpasses Early Origins o “Rickshaw” originates from the Japanese word jinrikisha o Rickshaws Japan around 1868 Meiji restoration o Round 1880, rickshaws appeared in India
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First in Simla 20 years later Calcutta Rickshaws in Kolkata o Uses “24 hour ambulance services” Exports for shoppers Businesses to transport goods Transport children Flooded streets “When it rains, even the governor takes rickshaws.” o Living conditions Rent their rickshaws for a few dollars per shift Live cheaply in hostels, trying to save money to send home
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2010 for the course GEOG 1003 taught by Professor Patzewitsch during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

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South Asia Lecture Notes - South Asia Setting the...

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