exam_2_summer_2009_key

exam_2_summer_2009_key - BIS 104 Summer Session II 2009...

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BIS 104 Name:________________________ Summer Session II 2009 Last, First Version A ID #:_________________________ BIS-104 MIDTERM II This exam has a total of 175 points. READ EACH QUESTION CAREFULLY BEFORE YOU ANSWER. SHOW ALL YOUR WORK TO GET FULL CREDIT. Please sign your name below and on the score sheet. This exam has 6 questions and is 10 pages including the cover page and score sheet. HONOR CODE: My signature below affirms that I wrote this exam in the spirit of the honor system of the University of California, Davis. I neither received nor furnished any help during the exam, nor did I use any unauthorized references. Signature:____________________________ Authorization for Public Distribution of Graded Examination I, _____________________________, ID#_________________________, authorize this exam to be placed in a holding bin following grading. The bins will be labeled BIS 104/Waddell, on the first floor of Briggs Hall.
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BIS 104 Name:________________________ Summer Session II 2009 Last, First Midterm II Question Points 1 ________ 2 ________ 3 ________ 4 ________ 5 ________ 6 ________ Total ________
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BIS 104 Name:________________________ Summer Session II 2009 Last, First 1) The behavior of Receptor X (XR), a transmembrane protein present in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells, is being investigated. The protein can be detected using a primary monoclonal antibody produced in mouse that recognizes the exoplasmic domain of XR. The primary antibody can then be detected with a fluorescently tagged secondary antibody that recognizes mouse antibodies. a) Cells expressing XR in their plasma membrane or artificial lipid vesicles (liposomes) containing XR embedded in the lipid bilayer are subjected to primary anti-XR antibody labeling followed by labeling with the fluorescently tagged secondary anti-mouse antibody. The labeled cells and vesicles are then subjected to FRAP. Briefly explain how this technique works and what it can be used for in cell biology. (10 Points) This technique is done by fluorescently tagging a membrane protein or lipid and observing its movement patterns in the membrane. For the XR protein described above, the tag is carried on a secondary antibody that would recognize a primary antibody which itself binds to the exoplasmic region of XR. A region of the cell membrane is then bleached of all fluorescent signal and then the same area is monitored for the re-emergence of fluorescence in the bleached area. If fluorescence returns then we can conclude that the protein or lipid is able to diffuse lateral in the bilayer and the area will be re-populated with fluorescence and this is called recovery. The name of this technique is called Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching and is very useful for monitoring movement within a bilayer. (10 points total. Give 5 points scaled for explaining what the technique can be used for and 5 points scaled for how well they explain the technique.) b) The data of the FRAP experiment are shown below. Figure 1
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2010 for the course BIS BIS 104 taught by Professor Privalsky during the Spring '09 term at UC Davis.

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exam_2_summer_2009_key - BIS 104 Summer Session II 2009...

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