Jan.20-2010 Theoretical Perspectives of Global Politics

Jan.20-2010 Theoretical Perspectives of Global Politics -...

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Theoretical Perspectives of Global Politics Theory: A statement or series of statements that organize, explain, and predict phenomena of interest. Theories of International Relations: 1. Realism 2. Liberalism 3. Critical Theories 4. Constructivism Realism: prioritizes national interest and security, rather than ideals, social reconstructions, or ethics Realism uses the view of Anarchy(No enforced authority) Nation-States are the main actors in Realism Security and Survival are highly important In summary, realists believe that mankind is not inherently benevolent but rather self- centered and competitive. No other states or institutions can be relied upon to Guarantee your own survival. National interests are prominent . Friendship and trust are temporary. Liberalism: Is the belief in the importance of individual freedom. Similar to realism in usage of anarchy, but order can be enforced through the formation
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Unformatted text preview: of international norms, international organizations, and the enforcement of international law. • Economic Interdependence (dependence of other) is good through trade. • Spread of democracy is the key to world peace –Woodrow Wilson Radical International Relations Theories: • Marxism-Karl Marx i. Capitalism is the central cause of international conflict • Neo-Marxism-Dependency Theory; Race to The Bottom A. Advanced capitalist countries grow rich by exploiting less developed countries. B. Darwinian struggle for capital, Income inequality, and environmental deteriortion. Constructivism: • State behavior is shaped by its identity • Actors with diverging identities are more likely to be antagonistic. • Actors with converging identities are more likely to form cooperation. • Identities can change through the socialization (learning from each other) process....
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2010 for the course PHIL 120 taught by Professor H during the Spring '10 term at James Madison University.

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Jan.20-2010 Theoretical Perspectives of Global Politics -...

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