Cranial capacity in hominid evolution

Cranial capacity in hominid evolution - 6 Imbricational...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
6. Imbricational enamel formation in Neandertals and recent modern humans D. GUATELLI-STEINBERG Department of Anthropology Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210, USA [email protected] D.J. REID Department of Oral Biology School of Dental Sciences Newcastle University, Framlington Place Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK [email protected] T.A. BISHOP Department of Statistics The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210, USA [email protected] C. SPENCER LARSEN Department of Anthropology Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210, USA [email protected] Keywords: perikymata, enamel, Neandertals, growth Abstract Aspects of imbricational enamel growth are important for two reasons. First, they may be species-typical, providing insight into taxonomic questions. Second, because dental and somatic growth are linked, aspects of imbricational enamel growth may also provide insights into species-typical rates of growth and development. The present study investigates aspects of imbricational enamel formation in Neandertal anterior teeth relative to three modern human population samples from diverse regions (Point Hope, Alaska; Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England; Southern Africa). A recent study by the same authors (Guatelli-Steinberg et al., 2005) focuses on evaluating how different Neandertals were from these modern human populations in the number of 211 S.E. Bailey and J.-J. Hublin (Eds.), Dental Perspectives on Human Evolution , 211–227 . © 2007 Springer.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
212 Guatelli-Steinberg et al. perikymata on their anterior teeth and in their imbricational enamel formation times. The present study integrates the results and conclusions of that study with research on imbricational enamel growth curves across deciles within anterior teeth and the pattern of imbricational enamel growth across anterior tooth types. The central findings of the present study are: (1) Neandertal anterior teeth overlap with those of the modern human samples in mean perikymata numbers and estimates of imbricational enamel formation times; (2) the modern human population samples show greater similarity to each other than any of them do to Neandertals in their enamel growth curves across deciles within tooth types; and (3) Neandertals exhibit a pattern in the mean number of perikymata across anterior tooth types that appears to diverge from that of the modern human samples. Introduction The long childhood growth period of modern humans has been interpreted as an adaptation that provides time for brain growth (Sacher, 1975; Martin, 1983; Leigh, 2001; Crews and Gerber, 2003) and/or extensive learning (Mann, 1972; Gould, 1977; Bogin, 1997; Leigh and Park, 1998). The complex behaviors made possible by large brains and protracted growth provide selective advan- tages that accrue over the extended human lifespan (Smith and Tompkins, 1995). Thus, a reduction in adult mortality rates may have been a pre- or co-requisite for the evolution of long childhoods in humans (Trinkaus and Tompkins, 1990; Kelley, 2002; Crews and Gerber, 2003). While the evolutionary condi-
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/20/2010 for the course BIOCHEM 410 taught by Professor Whien during the Winter '10 term at Ohio State.

Page1 / 17

Cranial capacity in hominid evolution - 6 Imbricational...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online