Organizational_Behavior_Ch18

Organizational_Behavior_Ch18 - Chapter 18 Strategic...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 18
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Strategic Capabilities and Organizational Design Chapter at a Glance In this chapter we show how firms can use strategy and organizational de- sign options to respond the demands of size, technology, and environment, and shape their competitive landscape to maintain dynamic capabilities. Keep in mind these study topics. STRATEGY, INNOVATION, AND ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING Strategy Innovation Organizational Learning Linking Strategy, Innovation, and Learning ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN Organizational Design and Strategic Decisions Organizational Design and Co-Evolution DESIGNING FOR GREATER CAPABILITY Size and Organizational Design Technology and Organizational Design Environment and Organizational Design Using Networks and Alliances PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER Building Dynamic Capabilities Across Borders Building Your Skills into Dynamic Capabilities CHAPTER 18 STUDY GUIDE How to compete in the 21st century
Background image of page 2
Y ou know General Mills for the big G on the morning cereal box, be it Cheerios, Wheaties, Lucky Charms, or Chex. 1 While this 75-year-old company traces its roots to the Minneapolis Milling Company, today the product mix also includes Progresso soups plus Green Giant canned and frozen vegetables. It has sales of over $12 billion, with a consistent string of yearly profits at or above the $1 billion mark. With well-known brands from the newly acquired Pillsbury (e.g., Betty Crocker) as well as Yoplait yogurt, you would think the CEO might emphasize steady expansion and protection of existing businesses. Not so: it is innovation that is empha- sized at General Mills. As Stephen W. Sanger, president and CEO, has said: “If you want your market to grow at a faster pace than the population, you must constantly develop new ap- proaches.” So look for the big G on more easy- to-prepare foods, small packages for the smaller households in the United States organic products, and probably something you never thought of. Says Sanger: “We do not think of innovation as an the company.” “. . . you must constantly develop new approaches.” 416 Strategy, Innovation, and Organizational Learning What Is Strategy? Strategy is the process of positioning the organization in the competitive envi- ronment and implementing actions to compete successfully. It is a pattern in a stream of decisions. 2 Choosing the types of contributions the firm intends to make to the larger society, precisely whom it will serve, and exactly what it will provide to others are conventional ways in which firms begin to make the pattern of de- cisions and corresponding implementations that define its strategy. The strategy process is ongoing. It should involve individuals at all levels of the firm to ensure that there is a recognizable, consistent pattern—yielding a superior capability over rivals—up and down the firm and across all its activities. This recognizable pat- tern involves the involvement of many facets to develop a sustainable, unique set
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/21/2010 for the course NA MGT 307 taught by Professor Unknown during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

Page1 / 28

Organizational_Behavior_Ch18 - Chapter 18 Strategic...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online