Organizational_Behavior_Ch15

Organizational_Behavior_Ch15 - Chapter 15 Conflict and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 15
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Conflict and Negotiation Chapter at a Glance Managerial work is interpersonal work, and the word “yes” when dealing with others can often open doors to success. Chapter 15 examines conflict and negotiation as key processes of organizational behavior. As you read, keep in mind these study topics. CONFLICT IN ORGANIZATIONS Types of Conflict Levels of Conflict Functional and Dysfunctional Conflict Culture and Conflict CONFLICT MANAGEMENT Stages of Conflict Causes of Conflict Indirect Conflict Management Approaches Direct Conflict Management Approaches NEGOTIATION What Is Negotiation? Negotiation Goals and Outcomes Ethical Aspects of Negotiation Organizational Settings for Negotiation Culture and Negotiation NEGOTIATION STRATEGIES Distributive Negotiation Integrative Negotiation How to Gain Integrative Agreements Common Negotiation Pitfalls Third-Party Roles in Negotiation CHAPTER 15 STUDY GUIDE “Yes” helps open doors
Background image of page 2
W hen Whitney Johns Martin needed investment capital to expand her consulting firm, it was very hard to find. As member of the board for the National Association of Women Business Owners, she took matters into her own hands and founded a venture capi- tal fund, Capital Across America, specifically to serve female-owned busi- nesses. The fund is de- scribed by Hoover’s as targeting investments of $250,000 to $1.5 million “in businesses with at least three years of operating history, an average annual growth rate of 15%, and an eye on ex- panding operations.” More than 8 million business owners in the United States are women, and they employ one in four American corporate workers. But it is often hard for women to find investment capital. Men, who seemed more comfortable dealing with men, managed most of the venture cap- ital funds that Martin dealt with when she was searching for investors. Martin believes that women and men have somewhat different approaches to business. According to her, women often underestimate themselves and don’t ask for enough during negotiations. Men, she says by contrast, “shoot for the moon” and ask for more than they typically need. On the other hand, Martin finds that women have a great capacity to de- velop extensive networks and relationships with cus- tomers, suppliers, and oth- ers. These are all great business resources, and they can be especially helpful in rallying to deal with economic difficulties. As a final re- minder in dealing with the venture capi- talists, Martin tells women to remember the basics when entering the negotiation: “Have an excellent business plan.” Whitney Johns Martin is president of Whitney Johns and Company, founder and CEO of Capital Across America, and chair of the Nashville Branch of the Atlanta Federal Reserve Bank. She is a member of the National Women’s Hall of Fame. 1
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 22

Organizational_Behavior_Ch15 - Chapter 15 Conflict and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online