Organizational_Behavior_Ch14

Organizational_Behavior_Ch14 - Chapter 14 Communication...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 14
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Communication Chapter at a Glance Interactions create the foundations for successful actions. This chapter exam- ines the nature of interpersonal and organizational communication as path- ways to effective interaction in organizations. As you read the chapter, keep in mind these study topics . THE NATURE OF COMMUNICATION The Communication Process Feedback and Communication Communication Channels Communication Directions and Flows INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION Effective and Efficient Communication Nonverbal Communication Active Listening Cross-Cultural Communication COMMUNICATION BARRIERS Physical Distractions Semantic Problems Mixed Messages Absence of Feedback Status Effects ISSUES IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION Electronic Communication Workplace Privacy Communication and Social Context CHAPTER 14 STUDY GUIDE Interact before you act
Background image of page 2
Y ou may not realize it, but when you use a Lenovo to type an assign- ment, you’re working on a Chinese- made computer. The Lenovo Group Ltd. bought IBM’s personal computer division and is presently the third largest computer maker in the world. And who sits in the CEO slot? It’s an American, Bill Amelio, who was hired away from a senior position at Dell. In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Amelio was asked if he considered Lenovo a Chi- nese company. His reply: “We’re a global company. We rotate the headquarters between Beijing, Hong Kong, Singapore, Raleigh (North Car- olina), and Paris.” He says he does not even have time to think about jet lag, but he is fully aware of the challenges of managing and communicating across cultures. He points out that American and European executives tend to speak their minds and “make their voices heard.” The Chinese, by contrast, are more prone to listening, and when they do speak, they choose their words care- fully. “If a Chinese colleague is nodding silently,” says Amelio, “it doesn’t mean they’re agreeing.” Amelio is well aware of the cross- cultural challenges of blending a world- wide team of talent. In an interview on CNN he said that trust, re- spect, and compromise are the key words. He also claims living and working in Asia has taught him a lot, and that he has gained new skills. “I work hard at listening a lot better,” he says. “I tend to be some- what impatient at times and it is much better to be patient . . . sometimes you have to kind of let things seep in for awhile.” Twenty-seven percent of Lenovo is owned by the Chinese government. One of Amelio’s first tasks was to deal with a rumor, picked up by members of the U.S. Congress, that the firm’s computers contained spy chips. He says without doubt that this was all politics and no substance. When asked if he speaks Mandarin, Amelio replies that he can say “hello” and “thank you.” Not surprisingly, his goal is to attend an immersion lan- guage program. 1
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 22

Organizational_Behavior_Ch14 - Chapter 14 Communication...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online